Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

The Sunday Cat warns: Do not try this at home! March 26, 2011

Filed under: Uncategorized — jj @ 11:05 pm

 

“Losing our way”

Filed under: human rights,politics,Uncategorized — jj @ 5:20 pm

In the recent post about Ferraro’s death, I was tempted to add a video of her 1984 acceptance speech.  However, the contrast between her optimism and the state of the union today gave her words a bitter taste.  Of course, political speeches are hardly known for being toned-down, but reading Bob Herbert’s column in today’s NY Times, “Losing our Way,” gives one a sense of bad omens around us. 

It’s his last column for the Times; here are some snippets:

So here we are pouring shiploads of cash into yet another war, this time in Libya, while simultaneously demolishing school budgets, closing libraries, laying off teachers and police officers, and generally letting the bottom fall out of the quality of life here at home…

 Limitless greed, unrestrained corporate power and a ferocious addiction to foreign oil have led us to an era of perpetual war and economic decline. Young people today are staring at a future in which they will be less well off than their elders, a reversal of fortune that should send a shudder through everyone.

The U.S. has not just misplaced its priorities. When the most powerful country ever to inhabit the earth finds it so easy to plunge into the horror of warfare but almost impossible to find adequate work for its people or to properly educate its young, it has lost its way entirely.

Herbert also draws our attention to the shocking example of GE, the nation’s largest corporation, “Despite profits of $14.2 billion — $5.1 billion from its operations in the United States — General Electric did not have to pay any U.S. taxes last year.”

 

How to avoid a gendered conference

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — Jender @ 4:48 pm

(This is a post for conference/workshop/summer school organisers, anthology editors, and anyone else who is putting together a collection of philosophers and finding they’re all male. It’s a part of our Gendered Conference Campaign, the motivations for which are explained here.)

So, you’re trying to think of people to invite to your conference, and all the ones who come to mind are male. Well, there was one woman but she said she was too busy. You’ve read (perhaps here, perhaps elsewhere) about the harms this can do in terms of implicit bias and stereotype threat. So you’d like to avoid an all-male conference. How might you do this?

What follows are some suggestions:

1. Realise that the first names you think of are overwhelmingly likely to be male. This is exactly what work on implicit bias would predict. So if you want some female names, you’ll need to work a little harder. You might ask around a bit. Or you might look at the papers cited by some of the men you’ve thought of to find some women who work in the area. Neither of these is ideal, though, since the same biases will make it harder for others to think of women, or to remember to cite them. Perhaps a better idea is to search for your topic on the Philosophers Index or Phil Papers, and see what women have written on it.

2. Studies have shown that women often need to have done a lot more to be considered successful than men do. There’s a good chance that you’re only thinking of super-famous women, while considering much less famous men. That is, you may well be setting the bar higher for women. So consider inviting some less famous women than those you first thought of. (This will also help redress injustice, since in many cases implicit bias will have been involved in these women being less famous.)

3. Don’t wait till the last minute to invite women.

4. If there really are not that many women in your field, perhaps consult with them first about dates. You have to ask someone first, so why not them?

5. Women are often at lower-prestige institutions, in lower ranked jobs. This means they’re likely to have less access to funds. (In a recent poll, we found that lack of funds was the top reason women declined invitations.) One way to make it more possible for women to attend would be to prioritise funding for those with less resources to draw upon. The super-famous often have super-big research accounts too. So go ahead and ask if they can self-fund. (If they’re offended by the question, they’re arseholes and you don’t want them at your conference.

6. Offer childcare at your conference. It’s not as hard as you think.

 

Geraldine Ferraro, RIP

Filed under: politics — jj @ 4:41 pm

The first woman to run on a major party ticket in a US presidential election. 

From USA Today:

Her family said “Geraldine Anne Ferraro Zaccaro was widely known as a leader, a fighter for justice, and a tireless advocate for those without a voice. To us, she was a wife, mother, grandmother and aunt, a woman devoted to and deeply loved by her family. Her courage and generosity of spirit throughout her life waging battles big and small, public and personal, will never be forgotten and will be sorely missed.”

Her congressional biography is here

 

 
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