Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Recognizing the African woman farmer September 1, 2012

Recognizing the African woman farmer (click here for full text)

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“Boys learning new ideas of masculinity around campfires in rural Africa and “sisterhoods” formed to provide a common voice to women are starting to change attitudes about African women farmers, say the authors of a forthcoming book about gender and agriculture. But it will take many more such efforts to support women food producers, who make up 43 percent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries. In some countries, that number rises to 70 to 80 percent…”

“…Transforming gender relations will be essential to this process. ‘All too often, men think that work on gender means that they will lose out, and historically it is true that programmes focusing on women only have ignored men’s real needs,’ Farnworth said.

Instead, efforts to effect change must target both women and men within households. ‘These work to transform how decisions taken regarding how to run the farm, and how to allocate money earned, and who benefits. The results have been really very impressive because women and men see the gains to cooperation so quickly – it can take only months to change patterns of behaviour that have existed for generations.’

Change also depends on the involvement of men at all levels, she said. ‘This is true particularly in the case of adapting technologies and integrating into market value chains. Our findings show that promoting methodologies that encourage cooperation between women and men farmers reap productivity dividends as women and men share resources across the farm and maximize the efficiency of their decision-making.’…”

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Recognising the African woman farmer – Interviews with the authors at the bottom of the page

Akinyi Nzioki, Centre for Land, Economy and Rights of Women: What We Do

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Cathy Rozel Farnworth

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Hajia Alima Mahama

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Melinda Fones-Sundell

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Violet ShivutseGroots KenyaUN Women Global Civil Society Advisory Group

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Marion Davis

Huairou Commission: Women, Homes, and Community

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“The Huairou Commission develops strategic partnerships and linkages among grassroots women’s organizations, advancing their capacity to collectively influence political spaces on behalf of their communities and enhance their sustainable, resilient community development practices…”

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http://www.huairou.org/groots-international

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Groots: Grassroots Organizations Operating Together In Sisterhood

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http://www.siani.se/

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4 Responses to “Recognizing the African woman farmer”

  1. [...] Recognizing the African woman farmer(feministphilosophers.wordpress.com) [...]

  2. The book “Transforming Gender Relations in Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa” is now available. The book is by Cathy Farnworth, Melinda-Fones Sundell, Akinyi Nzioki, Violet Shivutse, and Marion Davis.

    Click here for a low-res PDF of the entire book – the PDF file size is 3 MB.

    Click here for a high-res PDF of the entire book – the PDF file size is 43 MB.

    Also, below are links to five presentations from a session on “Transforming Gender Roles in Agriculture – Ways Forward” at the 2013 Agri4D Conference, Agricultural Research Towards Sustainable Development Goals:

    The possibilities and challenges for gender neutral pro-poor agricultural growth in Malawi and Zambia
    by Agnes Andersson Djurfeldt and Ellen Hillbom

    Gender, floods, mobility and agricultural transformations in low elevation zones of Quezon Province, Philippines: A Post-disaster View
    by Bernadette P. Resurrección

    Cattle in the Kalahari: Breeding Gendered Change
    by Andrea Petitt

    When Rain Clouds Don’t Gather: Gender, Agriculture, and Food Security in Botswana
    by Onalenna Selolwane

    Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community – Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
    by Blanca Iris Sandoval

    – David Slutsky


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