Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Blurred Lines and Double Standards August 28, 2013

Filed under: appearance,gender inequality,gender stereotypes,objectification,rape — philodaria @ 3:57 am

This seems apt to me:

Dear Society,

If you think a woman in a tan vinyl bra and underwear, grabbing her crotch and grinding up on a dance partner is raunchy, trashy, and offensive but you don’t think her dance partner is raunchy, trashy, or offensive as he sings a song about “blurred” lines of consent and propagating rape culture, then you may want to reevaluate your acceptance of double standards and your belief in stereotypes about how men vs. women “should” and are “allowed” to behave.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jill

For those of you who missed it, Dr. Jill is referring to the reactions to Miley Cyrus’s performance with Robin Thicke at the VMAs.

 

9 Responses to “Blurred Lines and Double Standards”

  1. Stacey Goguen Says:

    Very valid point.

    Though separately there were some hefty racial implications of her initial performance, which deserves some criticism and analysis for that.
    http://groupthink.jezebel.com/solidarity-is-for-miley-cyrus-1203666732

  2. Anonymous Says:

    Yes finally someone said it! Thank you Dr. Jill.

  3. Connie Says:

    Yes! This is EXACTLY what my husband and I were saying when we heard about all of the commotion. And for those who were complaining that the show wasn’t child friendly – when has the VMAs EVER been child friendly? What parent allows their child to watch anything on MTV if they are too young to handle sexual conduct? And what person in their twenties hasn’t let loose at some point?! Thank you for posting this.

  4. Lina Says:

    I like the groupthink piece and I’m glad to see someone writing about the intersections of race and gender in this media cluster**k. However the ‘hands off’ policy dictated by the author seems like a strange command in the context of performance and movement. Is booty dancing really equivalent to a Native American headdress? Is it appropriation for young white girls to shake their groove thing in ways that signify dance from Africa to the Caribbean to YouTube? I agree that the dancers who had their asses slapped in the VMA performance read like props but does it make sense to call ‘racism’ on young people who feel good exploring different styles of movement? It just seems to me that moving your own body (minus a headdress or a blackface or a clearly identifiable cultural costume) is fair game for exploration.

  5. […] Hmmm, two ways to go on that … yes censuring both is in order, but only one was a family hour/children’s TV hostess/actress. […]

  6. Synaesthetik Says:

    A good rebuttal: “How to talk to your sons about Robin Thicke” : http://ericclapp.org/2013/08/28/how-to-talk-with-your-sons-about-robin-thicke/

  7. beta Says:

    On the OTHER hand: Classic reversal parody! I dig the lines, “I apologize if you think my lines are crass. Tell me how it feels to be verbally harassed?”
    http://www.3news.co.nz/Students-parody-performance-blurs-lines/tabid/423/articleID/311517/Default.aspx

  8. JT Says:

    Yes, I loved Law Review’s parody. This is another good one:


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