Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Appearance norms – facial hair February 24, 2014

Filed under: appearance — Monkey @ 10:30 am

Harnaam Kaur
Photo credit: Huffington Post

Hats off to Harnaam Kaur! After enduring years of bullying due to her thick facial hair caused by polycystic ovary syndrome, she decided to stop attempting to shave, pluck, and bleach it out of existence, and for the last few years has had a full beard. Hats off too, to Harnaam’s brother, Gurdeep Singh (pictured above), who she says is her biggest supporter:

Kaur slipped once and shaved off her beard at the age of 17 after pressure from her extended family, but revealed: “All I could do was cry because I didn’t feel like myself without my beard.

“My brother was actually the one person who was completely shocked by what I had done – he hugged me and said I had looked so beautiful with my beard, he didn’t understand why I had done it.”

She added: “It was from that point that I thought I’m never going to remove it ever again.”

You can read more here.

 

Not the usual makeover reaction February 20, 2014

Filed under: appearance,Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 6:29 am

This video features four women who get makeovers, photoshoots, and photoshopping, and their reactions to the way they look. Could be useful in teaching. (Thanks, Mr J!)

 

‘They cannot change me’ January 21, 2014

This video is a nice commentary on beauty expectations for women in the entertainment industry. From Jezebel:

Here’s a striking video from Hungarian singer Boggie, in which her moving image is being retouched and “corrected” throughout the entire video. Directed by Nándor Lőrincz and Bálint Nagy, the three-minute video shows Boggie’s transformating from a lovely woman in dim lighting to a lovely, flawlessly made-up woman who has, judging by her glowing surroundings, been abducted by aliens and forced to sing for them.

 

 

PUT YOUR HEAD IN THE MACHINE January 7, 2014

Filed under: appearance,beauty — Jender @ 8:37 pm

In. The. Machine. YOU CAN’T BE BEAUTIFUL UNLESS YOU PUT YOUR HEAD IN THE MACHINE.
5010153552_fb2a56b625_o_final

(Thanks, Mr Jender!)

 

Women in Media in 2013 December 5, 2013

Some progress, but a lot of room for positive change.

  

 

Sexism, STEM, and Internet Bullying December 3, 2013

Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop talks about creepy, sexist, internet comments, what it’s like to be a woman in STEM related internet content creation, and what we can (begin) to do about it.

 

 

‘Don’t call me Freakface’: Changing Faces campaign November 25, 2013

Filed under: appearance,disability — Heg @ 9:14 pm

I can’t say I’m very familiar with Moshi Monsters, but I know how massively popular it is. So it seems important that it shouldn’t reinforce deeply unpleasant stereotypes about people with disfigurements by using character descriptions like ‘Bruiser’s scarred skin makes for a scary sight’. The charity Changing Faces is launching a campaign to change that:

Changing Faces, the national disfigurement charity, is launching a new campaign, ‘Don’t call me Freakface’.  It is calling on Mind Candy, the creators of Moshi Monsters, to stop using names like ‘Freakface’ which are common terms of abuse towards children with disfigurements.  It is also asking Mind Candy to stop using scars, spots and missing eyes to emphasize the evil nature of their bad characters.

There’s more in James Partridge’s blog post, including Mind Candy’s responses.  And for more on why it matters, see our post ‘Moving beyond the stereotypes‘.

 

Amazing photos of female athletes November 21, 2013

Filed under: appearance,beauty — magicalersatz @ 6:16 pm

Photographer Howard Schatz showcases the amazing diversity – and beauty – of the female athlete in a series of photos. The Huffington Post has more info.

female olympic athletes

female olympic athletes

 

Whose nude? October 26, 2013

Filed under: appearance,race — philodaria @ 1:40 am

No longer does ‘nude’ in the shoe world just mean flesh-tone only if you’re white. Christian Louboutin’s new ‘Les Nudes’ collection features shoes in five shades of nude.

[F]or ages in the fashion industry, the color nude has been synonymous with beige or pale peach, even going so far as to be called “flesh-toned,” as long as that flesh was white.

Louboutin’s decision to add a spectrum of nudes to his famous red-soled shoes comes on the heels of a dustup at last month’s New York Fashion Week, when Naomi Campbell and others released the names of designers whose runways lacked diverse models.

Read more here. Of course, we can debate the oppressive dynamics of the fashion industry and its cultural context, but still. Progress.

 

Is it less objectifying if you smile? September 30, 2013

Filed under: advertising,appearance,objectification — philodaria @ 5:24 am

The OMA rejected one version of two almost identical ads for the skincare brand [Ella Bache] because the models, who were using their hands to cover their naked bodies, had serious facial expressions that were interpreted as “too sexualised”. A version where the three models were smiling was accepted . . . The chief executive of the OMA, Charmaine Moldrich, defended the decision and told Fairfax, “I know its nuanced and subtle but there is a difference between a woman who is empowered, and happy to be here and a woman who is being objectified. It’s our job to make that make that call.”

 Whatever you think about the mitigating power of smiling and objectification, it’s disturbing that an unsmiling facial expression is considered more sexually “arousing” than the facial expression of a woman who looks happy. Read more (and see the images) here. 

 

 
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