Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Naomi Wolf on Aging: What do you think? August 12, 2014

Filed under: academia,ageing,aging,appearance,beauty,body,gender stereotypes,self-esteem,sex — annejjacobson @ 5:50 pm

Is the following just a description, or in part a recommendation? In any case, it carries a lot of information about values, though just whose may not be clear. In any case, what do you think about it? definitely on the right track? Spending too much on yoga, pilates, organic food and expensive hair stylists? Some big flaws? Just wait untill she gets to 65?

When I am at a social occasion, the showstoppers are no longer the young beauties in their 20s. Rather, those who draw all the light in the room are the women of great accomplishment and personal charisma — and these are usually women in midlife. (Indeed, at events I have attended recently, cadres of conventionally beautiful young women seem now to be treated almost like wallpaper or like the catering staff.)

The change in social norms around the issue of women’s aging is immense. There is now an influential and growing demographic of educated, well-off women whose status, sense of self-esteem and sexual cachet rise rather than fall as they head toward midlife. I do not see younger women looking at accomplished women in their 40s with pity or derision: I see them looking ahead with admiration and even envy...

Because of advances in health and well-being awareness, many women I know are entering midlife feeling as good as (and looking better than) they did in college. But they also have professional success, self-knowledge, sexual magnetism and awareness, and even thriving children, admiring husbands or ardent lovers. These signs of accomplishment merely add to the allure of many midlife women — women who, when asked if they would like to be in their 20s again, think of doing so with a shudder.

So male philosophers who hit on young women in classes or conference are what? Incredibly insecure? Following the pro-creation narrative? Out of touch with the values of the cultural elite?

 

‘They cannot change me’ January 21, 2014

This video is a nice commentary on beauty expectations for women in the entertainment industry. From Jezebel:

Here’s a striking video from Hungarian singer Boggie, in which her moving image is being retouched and “corrected” throughout the entire video. Directed by Nándor Lőrincz and Bálint Nagy, the three-minute video shows Boggie’s transformating from a lovely woman in dim lighting to a lovely, flawlessly made-up woman who has, judging by her glowing surroundings, been abducted by aliens and forced to sing for them.

 

 

PUT YOUR HEAD IN THE MACHINE January 7, 2014

Filed under: appearance,beauty — Jender @ 8:37 pm

In. The. Machine. YOU CAN’T BE BEAUTIFUL UNLESS YOU PUT YOUR HEAD IN THE MACHINE.
5010153552_fb2a56b625_o_final

(Thanks, Mr Jender!)

 

Amazing photos of female athletes November 21, 2013

Filed under: appearance,beauty — magicalersatz @ 6:16 pm

Photographer Howard Schatz showcases the amazing diversity – and beauty – of the female athlete in a series of photos. The Huffington Post has more info.

female olympic athletes

female olympic athletes

 

A woman, but not tall, skinny and blonde? July 9, 2013

Filed under: beauty,sports — Monkey @ 5:07 pm

… then how dare you win Wimbledon! Another face-palm moment from the intarwebz. What is wrong with people?

 

A Beautiful Body June 25, 2013

Filed under: Arts,beauty,body,empowering women,self-esteem — philodaria @ 1:26 am

Go check out this HuffPo article on photographer Jade Beall’s project documenting the beautiful, un-photo-shopped bodies of mothers (there’s a slideshow at the end with some photographs from her series–it’s stunning).

“We are facing an epidemic of women who feel unworthy of being called beautiful,” Beall told HuffPost, describing a world in which “nearly all of us struggle to feel beautiful in our own skin.” And the expectations faced by women who have given birth are particularly harsh. “Shaming mothers for not ‘bouncing back’ after childbirth can cause feelings of failure when being a mother is challenging enough and when a big number of us have already lived a life of feeling un-beautiful prior to giving birth,” she says.

It’s also worth watching her video on the Kickstarter page for the project.

 

Berlin Leftists’ New Target: Barbie Dreamhouse May 17, 2013

Filed under: advertising,appearance,beauty,body,gender stereotypes,gendered products — David Slutsky @ 12:37 pm

Berlin Leftists’ New Target: Barbie Dreamhouse (WSJ article by Mary M. Lane, 5/17/13)
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“Workers of the World Unite to Fight ‘Pinkified’ Resident, Stiletto Chairs”
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…”It would be a huge danger for capitalism if working men and women were united, so one of the best ways to divide and conquer the workers is by enabling men to over-sexualize women and by preoccupying women with sexualizing themselves,” said group leader Michael Koschitzki, 27 years old. “This is why we need to oppose Barbie.”…

“Barbie has been around for over 50 years. Can you show me that’s really held back society with all the positive changes for women?” asked Jörg Niepraschk, a father of two girls he brought to the Dreamhouse for a preview on Tuesday.

“The Junge Linke adamantly say “yes,” arguing that Barbie is a symbol of proletariat repression and a consumerist society set in place by power-hungry capitalists…

“The Junge Linke argue that Barbie’s “pinkified” personality cultivates a desire in girls to focus on looks instead of careers and spend their cash on expensive beauty products…


One of many wonderful papers that quickly come to mind is Sandra Bartky’s “Foucault, Femininity, and the Modernization of Patriarchal Power”. (Click here for a PDF copy posted on the web for now.)

 

The Scar Project: breast cancer is not a pink ribbon April 1, 2013

Filed under: appearance,beauty,cancer,Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 7:45 pm

The best explanation of the scar project comes with the second link below. I’ll try to give some background first.

Breast Cancer in young women is very worrying. The statistics put the chances of death within the standard 5 and 10 year markers quite high when compared to the rates of death in older women. In addition to this very scary fact, a cancer victim, young or old, typically ends up with surgery and other treatments, such as radiation, and may be left seriously scarred and even infertile. For many cancer victims, the cancer is fueled by estrogen, and it may make sense in some cases to have one’s ovaries removed.

Nonetheless, the beauty and dignity of cancer victims is very obvious, as the scar project is meant to show us in the young victims of this disease. I am going to link to an NY Times article and a clip about the project. There is also a video from youtube.You’ll be looking at the aftermath of surgery. Some women have had lumpectomies and others mastectomies. You may find the pictures difficult to look at, though my own squeamish self had no problem at all. Still, it seemed better to link to these pictures.

NYTimes article by Susan Gubar,

Clip linked to from the NYT,

Youtube

 

Pretty

Filed under: appearance,beauty,gender,objectification — philodaria @ 3:51 am

 

Transcript here.

 

Being honest about objectification March 21, 2013

Filed under: appearance,beauty,objectification — philodaria @ 1:46 pm

Well, the editor of the UK edition of Esquire is being honest about objectifying women, but has some how missed that this is sexist.

Esquire editor Alex Bilmes has admitted that the magazine uses pictures of “ornamental” women for male readers “in the same way we provide pictures of cool cars”.

Bilmes, who moved from rival men’s title GQ to edit Esquire in 2010, said that his magazine’s policy was “more honest” than that of the women’s magazine industry, which he claimed perpetuate negative images of women.

“The women we feature in the magazine are ornamental,” he said, speaking on a panel at the Advertising Week Europe conference in London on Tuesday. “I could lie to you if you want and say we are interested in their brains as well. We are not. They are objectified.”

Read the full story here with some ageism thrown in just for good measure.

 

 
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