Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Some reflections on the Tata Top July 4, 2014

Have you seen the new “Tata Top”? Feeling ambivalent about it? Of course you are!  Help is on the way.

Over at Fit Is a Feminist Issue, Tracy offers a useful survey of the pros and cons of the Tata Top. Check her post out here.

 

 

 

SCOTUS does it again June 30, 2014

Filed under: abortion,bias,empowering women,human rights — annejjacobson @ 6:46 pm

I don’t understand why contraception meds can be disallowed while viagra isn’t (but see comment one).  Still, if you think businesses have no business deciding on the availability of certain contraceptives, then TAKE ACTION.

Use the link above to go to the petition.

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How to mentor, review, etc: something to think about June 16, 2014

Filed under: academia,empowering women,Uncategorized,women in philosophy — annejjacobson @ 2:56 pm

Have you ever felt flattened by a negative review? Been the target of comments that left you feeling you were in the wrong? Here’s a thought about how you might avoid leaving someone else in the same state:

I’m not in a position to validate the research, but I think there are some ideas well worth discussing

 

Lego to launch new female scientist line June 4, 2014

Filed under: empowering women,science — Lady Day @ 1:13 pm

Yay! Lego will soon be launching a new line of female scientists — and blocky bits of equipment for those scientists. Here’s a link.

science1.jpg

Thanks, Jender-Mom!

 

 

Why are there so few women in philosophy? May 22, 2014

    The data on doctorates is telling. According to recent research the number of women receiving doctorates in philosophy is very near the bottom of the academic barrel.

    This blog has been looking at many facets of this problem. See our discussions of research here and here, for example. Or search our site for posts on implicit bias and stereotype threat.

    New research is opening up our understanding of another factor, which resides in the beliefs about one’s ability to succeed in a career:

    The decision to pursue a career rests in part on how we judge the following inequality:

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    If we believe this inequality to be true, we might proceed; if we decide it’s false, we might look elsewhere. Importantly, however, neither side of this inequality is easy to evaluate. Abilities are nebulous, context-sensitive things that are notoriously problematic to pin down. As a result, we often look to others for clues, leaving the door open for substantial social and cultural influences on career choices. A symposium at the 2014 SPSP conference in Austin highlighted a number of recent findings that link sociocultural influences on people’s assessment of the inequality above to the presence of gender gaps.

    How do we get from sociocultural influences on this formula all the way to gender gaps? First, and most obviously, contemporary culture is rife with stereotypes about differences in men’s and women’s cognitive profiles; these stereotypes shape people’s beliefs about the quantity on the left-hand side (that is, the abilities they are likely to possess). Second, and less often discussed, practitioners of different careers may send different messages about the abilities that are required to reach the highest levels of achievement in their particular field; these messages shape people’s beliefs about the quantity on the right-hand side (that is, the abilities required for success). Putting these two elements together, we might make the following claim: One circumstance that gives rise to a gender gap in a career or discipline is when a gender group is stereotyped to lack an ability that the people in that discipline believe is essential for success.

    The post from which the quote above comes comes is full of interesting ideas and results. It’s a must read for anyone interested in the questions concerning access and opportunity.

    Here are some snippets:

    In some disciplines success may be seen as depending on sustained effort and dedication, whereas in others it may be seen as requiring a “gift” or brilliance that cannot be taught. Because women are stereotyped as being less likely than men to possess innate intellectual talent, they may find the academic fields that emphasize brilliance as the key to success to be unwelcoming. [note that the claim here is that the fields themselves may seem less welcoming. This seems different from the conclusions of Carol Dweck that we discuss in our Psychology of Philosophy section.]

    – Regardless of the purported cognitive differences men and women, or of the abilities purportedly required to become a physicist vs. a psychologist vs. an anthropologist, the mere presence of (1) different societal beliefs about the intellectual abilities of men and women, and (2) different societal beliefs about the intellectual abilities required for success in different fields will be sufficient to give rise to (or at least exacerbate) gender gaps.

    Stereotypes may have many different sources. To the extent that they contain messages about ability, this research says they may quite significantly affect career choices. Though the research is specifically about gender, we should keep it in mind as we think about issues such as the incredibly low representation of blacks in higher education in The Uk. Or the abled body whiteness of US philosophy.

    (Thanks to BL.)

 

Schliesser on de Gournay: sexism is “serious blasphemy” April 26, 2014

Yesterday, at his Digressions & Impressions blog, Eric Schliesser posted a (second) lovely discussion of 17th century philosopher Marie de Gournay and her account of the Church’s role in the subordination of women. Strikingly, de Gournay argues that, in having played this role, Christianity also oppresses men, by encouraging them to make idols of themselves.

For, men have chosen to let themselves be ruled by “superiority of…strength” (73) and not their rational faculty. In fact, she argues that in so doing men have committed “serious blasphemy” because men have elevated themselves above women. For, women are “worthy of being made in the image of the Creator, of benefiting from the most holy Eucharist and the mysteries of redemption and of paradise, and of the vision–indeed, the possession–of God.” (73) Man’s political decision to deny women “the advantages or privileges of man” is, thus, a way to make an idol of himself. 

De Gournay’s argument is a powerful reply to the Pauline-Augustinian argument that woman only expresses God’s image when she is united to man (de Trinitate, Book 12, Ch. 7). I know what I’ll be adding to the syllabus the next time I teach philosophy of gender. Thanks, Eric!

 

Leaning in, leaning back, overwork and gender February 24, 2014

Filed under: empowering women,family,gender,maternity,parenting,paternity,work — Jender @ 9:52 am

Interesting article.

And just as work has expanded to require employees’ round-the-clock attention, being a good mom has also started requiring ubiquity. Things were different in my own childhood, but today, parenting has become a full-time job: it requires attendance at an unending stream of birthday parties, school meetings, class performances, and soccer games, along with the procurement of tutors, classes, and enrichment activities, the arranging of play dates, the making of organic lunches, and the supervising of elaborate, labor-intensive homework projects than cannot be completed without extensive adult supervision.
Oh yes: By incredible coincidence, parenting was discovered to require the near-constant attention of at least one able-bodied adult at just about the same time women began to pour into the workforce in large numbers. Sorry ’bout that, girls!

We need to fight for our right to lean out, and we need to do it together, girls. If we’re going to fight the culture of workplace ubiquity, and the parallel and equally-pernicious culture of intensive parenting, we need to do it together — and we need to bring our husbands and boyfriends and male colleagues along, too. They need to lean out in solidarity, for their own sake as well as ours.
Women of the world, recline!

 

Know your Title IX (reposted) February 16, 2014

Interesting information in the comments makes this material worth reposting:

Here’s a resource that looks useful for understanding Title IX issues.  It’s geared primarily to students who may have needs and need assistance, but don’t know where to turn or what to do.  http://knowyourix.org

 

Sexism, STEM, and Internet Bullying December 3, 2013

Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop talks about creepy, sexist, internet comments, what it’s like to be a woman in STEM related internet content creation, and what we can (begin) to do about it.

 

 

Spoken Word Performance Set to Scenes from Pocahontas December 1, 2013

Filed under: colonialism,empowering women — Stacey Goguen @ 4:49 pm

Racialiscious has a post up entitled, “Thanksgiving is Complicated,” in which they share the mashup below, which is of the spoken word piece, “Slip of the Tongue” by Adriel Luis set to scenes from Pocahontas.

The mashup is by Samantha Figueroa and is entitled, “Once Tongue Tied”:

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If after watching it you are in the mood for more badass art, check out this piece by Mohadesa Najumi, entitled, “A Letter To All Women Who Have Been Told To Quieten Down, Speak Softer and Be Less Angry” over at the Feminist Wire.

 

 
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