Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Guggenheim Fellows: Two Feminist Philosophers April 12, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — KateNorlock @ 7:54 pm

If you look at the 2014 list of Guggenheim Fellowship recipients, you’ll see only two names under Philosophy: Eva Kittay and Laurie Paul.  Congratulations to our colleagues for this well-deserved honor!  It is an especial pleasure to see two feminists constitute the entire Philosophy list.

Congratulations are due to other philosophers and feminists, as well. Recipients in Classics include a notable philosopher, John Palmer, and recipients in Religion include a notable feminist, Joyce Flueckiger, author of When the World Becomes Female: Possibilities of a South Indian Goddess.  All recipients are to be commended.

 

SASSY Sharing Academic Sexism Stories w/You

Filed under: academia,sexism — hippocampa @ 2:27 pm

 

@anyatopolski alerted me to the Sassy platform (Sharing Academic Sexism Stories with You),  which was launched on International Women’s Day last month. The site, in four languages, was founded by an independent group of volunteers from Belgian academic institutions and NGOs who wanted to provide an online space for stories that are otherwise only shared in private conversations.cropped-wp_header_bg_blueredgray_ac1[1]

Yesterday at the first official meeting of SWIP.NL (in Dutch), which was attended by both Dutch and Belgian members, the question was raised whether sexism was worse in the Netherlands or in Belgium. The proportion of female professors is appalling in both countries, and appears to be even worse for philosophy than for other subjects.

It would be nice if all the SWIPs in the world would team up together and get some funding to get it properly researched!

This SASSY project, however, is yet another good initiative to show that there really is a problem with sexism in academia.

 

Lori Gruen on recent animal deaths at European zoos April 10, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sam B @ 5:06 pm

“Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely. Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.”

Read the rest of Disposable Captives at the Oxford University Press blog.

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

 

The New Yorker profiles philosopher and letter writer Felicia Nimue Ackerman

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sam B @ 4:08 pm

“Felicia Nimue Ackerman—“Felicia Nimue is a double first name like Mary Jane, and I’m called the whole thing”—is a short-story writer and a philosophy professor at Brown, and she excels at crafting arguments concisely. Since 1987, the Times has printed more than two hundred of her letters, which is either a record or close to one. Tom Feyer, the letters editor, doesn’t keep count, but he named Ackerman as a top contender for first place. “Some days she sends several letters, each in response to a different article,” he said. “Although I don’t know her personally, I have a good sense of how she thinks.” In 2006, IvyGate, a gossip blog covering the Ivy League, published a post under the headline “New N.Y. Times Policy Requires All Letters to Be From Single Brown Professor.” The following year, Gawker wrote a post about one of Ackerman’s letters (“Ivy Professor: Sundaes Are Yummy!,” and a commenter wrote, “I used to edit the letters column for one of the pull-out sections in the Times, and we had a rule against running too many Felicia Ackermans…. One woman wrote us one time asking if her chances of having her letter published would be significantly improved if she signed her letter Felicia Ackerman.””

 

Read the rest here.

 

CFP: Phenomenology Roundtable

Filed under: Uncategorized — KateNorlock @ 3:56 pm

CFP: Phenomenology Roundtable
June 12-14 at Canisius College, Buffalo NY

Featuring Invited Presenter:
Dr. Jackie Martinez (Arizona State)

The Phenomenology Roundtable is a cooperative, supportive and critical environment for scholars whose work is inspired by the classical phenomenology of Edmund Husserl. We welcome works-in-progress at any stage of development. We welcome and encourage work in phenomenology that engages feminist theory, queer theory, ethical and political philosophy and philosophy of race and racism.

Email organizers about your intent to present by April 15th
Notification of Acceptance: April 30th
Works-in-Progress Due to conference participants: May 30th

For more information, email coordinators:

Melissa Mosko (moskom at canisius.edu)

David Leichter (djleichter24 at marianuniversity.edu)

 

A small tale of helping

Filed under: women in philosophy — Jender @ 9:37 am

Go read about a way to help women in philosophy, over at What We’re Doing.

 

Banning art April 9, 2014

Filed under: women in philosophy — annejjacobson @ 7:05 pm

Banning art on textbook covers, that is.  Would you refuse to have a picture on a book on social or political grounds? let’s suppose it really does count as art, is not outre, and in fact has a very traditional and even beloved subject matter?

What about this one?

http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199560554.do

 

what do you think?

 

Thanks, jc

 

This will make you feel better April 8, 2014

Filed under: human rights — annejjacobson @ 2:58 pm

image

 

CFP: Feminist Philosophy of Science

Filed under: CFP — philodaria @ 2:46 am

CFP: ‘Feminist Philosophy of Science,’ Ghent, 24-25 November, 2014

The Department of Philosophy & Moral Sciences, Ghent University welcomes abstracts for an international workshop on Feminist Philosophy of Science.

Invited keynote speaker is:

• Stéphanie Ruphy (Université Pierre Mendès France, Grenoble)

We welcome paper proposals on a variety of topics related to the conference theme, including (but not limited to) contributions to: feminist philosophy of science, feminist science(s), the role of science(s) in feminism(s), the status of feminist philosophy of science in philosophy of science (and philosophy more broadly), the history of feminist philosophy of science, etc.

Scientific committee: Leen de Vreese (Ghent), Aurélie Van De Peer (Ghent), and Merel Lefevere (Ghent).

Local Organizing committee: Leen de Vreese (Ghent), Aurélie Van De Peer (Ghent), Merel Lefevere (Ghent), and Eric Schliesser (Ghent).

Please send abstracts (maximum 500 words) prepared for blind review to Eric Schliesser, nescio2 [at] yahoo.com,  by July 1, 2014. Please include identifying information in separate page or accompanying email.

 

Whiteness of academia, and celebration of eugenicist April 7, 2014

Filed under: academia,race — Jender @ 9:51 am

Gosh, could there be a connection?

William Ackah, lecturer in community and voluntary sector studies at Birkbeck, University of London, told the event, which was chaired by UCL provost and president Michael Arthur, that outdated Victorian views on the “wild and untamed” nature of “the Negro” still persisted at some level in UK universities.

“This [idea] that black life is…anti-intellectual still echoes down the corridors of time,” Dr Ackah said on 10 March.

“Society has grown comfortable with black people in sport or music, [but] it has a problem with black people leading in public life and academia, even if…we are more than capable of doing so,” he added.

The situation contrasts with US universities, where the existence of black studies courses had created a space for black academics to gain a foothold in academic life, Dr Ackah explained.

And also…

Amid many comments from a mainly black audience of students and academics, UCL itself was also criticised for its uncritical praise of one of its benefactors, the Victorian polymath Francis Galton, known as the “father of eugenics”.

One student raised the issue of UCL’s Galton Lecture Theatre – Galton also endowed a professorial chair in eugenics, now genetics, at UCL – in light of the scientist’s controversial opinions on the “inferior Negro race”, whom he hoped to be supplanted in Africa by the “industrious, order-loving Chinese”.

“Why do we celebrate someone like Francis Galton who hated us [ie, black people]?” the student asked.

Thanks, N!

 

 
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