Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Tampon-gate July 12, 2013

Filed under: abortion,discrimination,gender inequality,politics — philodaria @ 8:35 pm
Tags: , , ,

Tampons and other feminine hygiene products are not being allowed in the Texas capitol building today, for the hearing on House Bill 2 restricting abortion rights. Guns are still allowed. And no, this is not from The Onion. 

 

Vaginas of Anarchy July 10, 2013

North Carolina’s GOP tacked on abortion restrictions to State Bill 353, which was the Motorcycle Safety Act. This, just after tacking on abortion restrictions on to House Bill 695 (originally aimed at banning the recognition of Sharia law in family courts). As of this moment, I can’t access the new text of the bill via the official NC legislative site, but you can find more information from those on the front lines on twitter.

And in the meanwhile, here’s a song about what’s been going on (with some explicit language).

UPDATE: More information from HuffPo:

On Wednesday morning, state Rep. Joe Sam Queen (D) wrote on Twitter, “New abortion bill being heard in the committee I am on. The public didn’t know. I didn’t even know.”

 

God intended what now? October 24, 2012

Filed under: abortion,politics,rape,reproductive rights — philodaria @ 5:00 pm
Tags: , ,

From the Indiana Senate debate between Richard Mourdock (R), Joe Donnelly (D), and Andrew Horning (L):

Asked whether abortion should be allowed in cases of rape or incest, Mourdock said during Tuesday’s debate, “I struggled with it myself for a long time, but I came to realize that life is that gift from God. And, I think, even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen.”

Mourdock has said he regrets that anyone has interpreted him as implying that sexual violence is anything other than abhorrent, but:

 “In answering a question from my position of faith, I said I believe that God creates life, and I believe that as wholly and fully as I can believe, that God creates life.”

 

 

Want to join the Occupy Wall Street protest? UPDATE October 4, 2011

Filed under: human rights,politics — annejjacobson @ 3:34 pm
Tags:

You can, virtually. Moveon.org is planning a virtal version for Oct fifth.

I have no idea what they have planned; people who sign up will find out Wed morn.

UPDATE:  If you go to this page, you can send a  message of support.  Go here and be counted. 

 

It couldn’t happen here, could it? June 8, 2011

Filed under: maternity,politics,reproductive rights — cornsay @ 9:55 am
Tags: , ,

Chip, chip, chippity chip. That’s the steady sound of American legislatures, lawyers, and lobbying groups taking their chisels to what should be solid stone rights, and setting to work eroding them. We’re talking, of course, about abortion and procreative choice: the right to have an abortion; the right to have one freely, unmolested by the state, without shame or guilt; and more generally, the right to choose not only whether to bear a child, but also how to approach one’s own pregnancy and childbirth.

You can now hear an echo of that chipping sound in the UK. Quietly, quite similar tactics are being adopted, not just by protest groups (as noted by Jender here), but also by politicians. The Prime Minister has a consistent record of calling for the time limit on abortions to be reduced. This familiar ploy to curtail the availability of abortion failed in a Commons vote in 2008, but only by 71 votes. Then there’s the astonishing decision (noted by Jore on the Jender thread just mentioned) to give the pro-abstinence, anti-abortion group LIFE a place on the Sexual Health and HIV advisory panel. And finally, the thing that prompted me to write a quick post, the nasty little piece of legislation mentioned here, seven paragraphs down:

an amendment to the health and social care bill that would create a new precondition for women having an abortion to receive advice and counselling from an organisation that does not carry out terminations.

It will be no surprise to anyone familiar with the UK’s politics that Nadine Dorries is responsible for this reprehensible suggestion, along with the former Labour minister Frank Field. It’s not clear just how much chance this amendment has of making it on to the statute books; probably, thankfully, not too large a chance. There’s still a long way to go before the UK forces women to pay for and look at an ultrasound prior to having an abortion. Even so… chip, chip, chip.

 

 

Join Obama’s Government November 10, 2008

Filed under: jobs — Jender @ 12:23 pm
Tags: ,

Instead of just watching to see who is appointed, you may want to consider applying for a job!

 

Women’s “Health” October 29, 2008

Filed under: gender,politics,sex — Jender @ 3:07 pm
Tags: , , ,

Samantha Bee on John McCain’s air quotes, at about 3 minutes 20 seconds in. Thanks, Mr Jender!

 

Biden’s Tears October 4, 2008

Filed under: paternity,politics — Jender @ 7:06 am
Tags: , , ,

Leah McElrath Renna writes:

Joe Biden did more for the equality of the sexes with his honest display of paternal emotion during the vice presidential debate than Sarah Palin’s presence on the executive ticket has or will ever do.

Biden visibly teared up when he rebutted the idea that “just because I am a man” he didn’t understand what it was like to wonder whether or not a child would “make it” in recovering from a life-threatening medical situation. At the time, he was likely recalling the tragic automobile accident that killed his wife and daughter and severely injured his two sons. It was an authentic, moving and powerful moment. It was, in fact, the strongest expression of real paternal love we have seen from a public official in recent memory and maybe ever.

By bringing that reality to a national political stage, Biden demonstrated that — for all of us, not just feminists — the personal is political, that women alone do not have the sole responsibility for caring about the future of our children and that the concern of fathers is a largely untapped pool of political energy

An interesting thought. (Do you agree?) I find myself also very struck by the fact that nobody has suggested that it was a sign of weakness, and nobody has suggested that it was crass political manipulation (as they did with Clinton). (And speaking of crassness, is anyone else as bothered as I am by all “See Biden choke up!” links to the video?)

 

Treating Palin Like a Man September 12, 2008

Filed under: gender,objectification,politics,sex — Jender @ 3:04 pm
Tags: ,

In just one day, two people have sent me to very different articles suggesting that we should treat Palin like a man, and offering very different interpretations of this.

First, Joel Stein.

But I think whatever wave of feminism we’re on in 2008 demands that I objectify Palin. Just as Obama Girl, JFK’s teenage admirers and anyone who’s been within 100 yards of Mitt Romney can swoon without implying those guys’ ineffectualness, I think women are now taken seriously enough that I should be able to admit to noticing a female political leader’s hotness without being accused of sexism.

Next, Katha Pollitt.

The more time we spend on dippy ruminations–how does she do it? Queen Bee on steroids or the hockey mom next door? how hot is Todd, anyway?–the less focus there will be on the kind of queries that should come first with any vice presidential candidate, and certainly would if Palin were a man. Questions like:
§ Suppose your 14-year-old daughter Willow is brutally raped in her bedroom by an intruder. She becomes pregnant and wants an abortion. Could you tell the parents of America why you think your child and their children should be forced by law to have their rapists’ babies?
§ You say you don’t believe global warming is man-made. Could you tell us what scientists you’ve spoken with or read who have led you to that conclusion? What do you think the 2,500 scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are getting wrong?
§ If you didn’t try to fire Wasilla librarian Mary Ellen Baker over her refusal to consider censoring books, why did you try to fire her?
§ What is the European Union, and how does it function?
§ Forty-seven million Americans lack health insurance. John Goodman, who has advised McCain on healthcare, has proposed redefining them as covered because, he says, anyone can get care at an ER. Do you agree with him?

Thanks to Sally and Jender-Parents for the links.

 

Life after philosophy graduate school? September 8, 2008

Filed under: politics — annejjacobson @ 5:14 pm
Tags:

I remember well a really great, kind TA when I was an undergraduate, John Judis.  And now he’s got another job. 

In case you have a graduate student looking for an easy alternative to the thesis, Judis is certainly not a good model for that. From his bio at the New Republic:

An active member of SDS and the left of the Sixties, he taught philosophy at Berkeley and at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Judis was a founding editor of the Socialist Revolution in 1969, now called Socialist Review. In 1975 he started a new monthly called East Bay Voice. He moved to Washington in 1982 as the Washington correspondent for In These Times. Soon afterwards, he began writing for TNR and for GQ. His articles have also appeared in The American Prospect, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, The Washington Monthly, American Enterprise, Mother Jones, and Dissent.

His books include The Paradox of American Democracy: Elites, Special Interests, and the Betrayal of Public Trust, William F. Buckley: Patron Saint of the Conservatives, and Grand Illusion: Critics and Champions of the American Century.

 

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,682 other followers