The Work or a bit of work

Eric Schliesser has lovely post ruminating on how to orient oneself toward research, writing, and scholarly production. It is happily not a work/life balance post – I at least tire of these since they inevitably make me feel like achieving a work/life balance is, well, one more bit of work I’m meant to do. Instead, Schliesser creates a taxonomy regarding the ways people orient themselves toward academic work, describing 3 types and focusing on the last:

A: It pays the bills; work is work.

B: It’s a fun and challenging way to earn a decent salary, but there is more to living.

C: It’s the best form of escapism from the rest of reality (recall here) and (let’s stipulate), luckily, it is also justified by way of the best available argument.

I think it would be consistent with what Schliesser offers to understand C with a little broader latitude and include not just escapism but perhaps what he intimates later in the piece, deriving (some significant measure of) well-being via one’s contributions to scholarly conversations one finds meaningful and valuable. Maybe what matters most for my purposes is that Schliesser’s C is what I think of as the “all in” attitude, the orientation we take when, on the whole if not every day, we identify scholarly work as an enormously prominent life priority or life-governing project.

Schliesser’s post is largely concerned with what sorts of strategies can bring a C-orientation together with other important life goods and projects. I don’t want to summarize what he offers – please do go read it! Instead, I want to make what I think sometimes gets treated as a shameful confession: I’m a B person. Rather, I have over time become a B person. And I suspect there are other B people out there who, like me, feel a bit sheepish about it. The sheepishness is why I’m writing this post, since I circumspectly think it unwarranted and wish it were a more commonplace admission (assuming there are in fact other B people out there).Read More »

And the years just fell away

Two events last week seemed to come at me from the past. They could have occurred five years ago, or even 10 or 20 years ago. I did not, however, feel a burst of youth. Rather, I felt a real sadness for all of us who had once found such things common.

One was a lecture at the Jowett Society at Oxford and the other an emailed notice. The lecture itself itself was given by Jennifer Lackey. It was terrific. In fact, I wanted to raise an issue. Indeed, I put my hand up. And then someone else was called on. When that discussion was over, I put my hand up again. And then again. For 50 min my arm was straight up whenever there was a pause for a question. I was incredulous.  I might as well have been invisible.  I finally spoke out.

The other event was earlier. The other event was the CFP for this conference.

SCIENTISM AND CONSCIOUSNESS
A Conference at Keele University, UK, 27-28th June 2017

Keynote Speakers
Philip Goff • John Cottingham • James Tartaglia • Keith Frankish • Christopher Norris

Five male speakers and no female speakers. I was incredulous, and indeed kept rereading the list to spot my mistake.

Well, one good thing: Jennifer Lackey’s sterling performance was a great example of why and how we benefit when women can speak.

Social Class, Gender, and Bias

A new study on law school internship hiring has yielded interesting and dismaying results regarding the influence of both social class and gender on hiring. A c.v. study found that call back rates for men track class indicators, with men having c.v.s indicating lower class origins markedly disfavored relative to men with markers for higher class origins. The beneficial effects of higher class origins disappear for women, however, and women with markers for higher class origins received the lower callback rates than their lower class peers. A follow up study suggests that these women were perceived as the greatest “flight risk”:

Attorneys cited “family” as a primary reason these women would leave. Parenting strategies vary between social classes, and the intensive style of mothering that is more popular among the affluent was seen as conflicting with the “all or nothing” nature of work as a Big Law associate. One female attorney we interviewed described this negative view of higher-class women, which she observed while working on her firm’s hiring committee. The perception, she said, was that higher-class women do not need a job because they “have enough money,” are “married to somebody rich,” or are “going to end up being a helicopter mom.” This commitment penalty that higher-class women faced negated any advantages they received on account of their social class.

The study itself is disturbing in multiple ways, not least because the class penalties emerge in response to what would otherwise be laudatory information (e.g., working as a peer-mentor for first generation college students) or benign information (e.g., liking country music or sports with low cost). Moreover, the benefits accrued to higher class men relative to both women and their lower class male peers were dramatic: The higher class man “had a callback rate more than four times of other applicants and received more invitations to interview than all other applicants in our study combined.”

 

Reminder: Mentoring Programme

REMINDER: Applications for the 2017 Mentoring Workshop for Early-Career Women in Philosophy are due Deadline for applications is March 1. For application instructions, and complete information about the Mentoring Program, visit our website: http://www.bu.edu/philo/people/faculty/mentoring-project/

The Mentoring Program is co-directed by Louise Antony (UMass), Juliet Floyd and Susanne Sreedhar (Boston U).  Supported by the Marc Sanders Foundation; the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Philosophy, Boston University; the Department of Philosophy and the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, U Mass; and the Society for Philosophy and Psychology.

Social Philosophy: Extension of CFP deadline

Thirty-Fourth International Social Philosophy Conference

Sponsored by the North American Society for Social Philosophy

with the Department of Philosophy, Loyola University, Chicago

July 13-15, 2017

Scholars maintaining boycotts of travel to the USA who had planned on submitting are being encouraged to submit their abstracts (we are extending our deadline by one week to February 22nd).  In the event of your submission’s acceptance, we are exploring the possibility of a limited number of off-site presentation slots (e.g., by Skype) being made available for those honoring the boycott.

Please submit a 300 word abstract at: http://www.northamericansocietyforsocialphilosophy.org/call-for-abstracts/

Proposals in all areas of social philosophy are welcome, but special attention will be devoted to:

Justice: Social, Criminal, Juvenile

Some possible paper topics include:

Read More »

CFP: Aesthetics, Rocky Mountain style

Rocky Mountain Division

American Society for Aesthetics

Call for Papers

The Thirty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Division of the American Society for Aesthetics will take place at the Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, July 7-9, 2017.

The submission deadline is March 1, 2017. Please send proposals as 200 word abstracts and offers to organize panels to: aesthetics.rmd at gmail dot com

Manuel Davenport Keynote Address: Mary Devereaux

Mary Devereaux, Ph.D., is a philosopher and bioethicist at University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Much of her work in aesthetics is dedicated to feminist issues and moral critiques of the power of art. Articles such as “Beauty and Evil: The Case of Leni Riefenstahl’s ‘Triumph of the Will’”; “ Moral Judgments and Works of Art: The Case of Narrative Literature.”; “Oppressive Texts, Resisting Readers and the Gendered Spectator: The New Aesthetics,” ; “More Than ‘Meets the Eye’. Autonomy and its Feminist Critics.”; “ Protected Space: Politics, Censorship, and the Arts” have influenced a generation of scholars interested in film theory, literary theory and feminist aesthetics.

Read More »

CFA: 11th Annual M.A.P Graduate Student Philosophy Conference – Florida State University

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
The Minorities and Philosophy chapter at Florida State University, is pleased to announce the 11th Annual M.A.P Graduate Student Philosophy Conference to be held on Friday, March 31st, 2017. This year we are greatly pleased to have Anita Superson (University of Kentucky) as our keynote speaker.

We welcome papers in all areas of philosophy that explore intersectionality of race, gender, class, sexuality, disability, culture, and native language. Papers should be suitable for a 20-25 minute presentation.

Abstracts with a length of no more than 500 words can be submitted to fsumapconference [at] gmail [dot] com. The abstract should be prepared for anonymous review. Please indicate your contact information and institutional affiliation in the body of your email submission. We will be updating our website with accessibility guidelines for accepted presenters shortly.

Submission deadline is Monday, February 20th. Accepted speakers will be notified on Friday, February 24th. If you have any further questions please contact Rachel Amoroso at ra15k [at] my.fsu [dot] edu.

When ICE knocks

ICE = US Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

According to today’s Houston Chronicle, there’s a lot of anxiety in the city among immigrants even though the city is a ‘sanctuary’ city. The newspaper has printed a set of guidelines. Even if you are ‘safe’, knowing these guidelines is worthwhile. They may help you keep others safe.

img_3220