CFP Extended deadline BayFAP 2019 Workshop

NEW DEADLINE: 15 DECEMBER!

CFP BayFAP 2019
https://sites.google.com/view/bayfapworkshop/home

The 2019 Bay Area Feminism and Philosophy (BayFAP) Workshop will be held at the University of San Francisco from May 20-22. BayFAP is different from typical conferences in important ways—if you’re not familiar with it, please read this CFP carefully.

Because BayFAP is a workshop-style conference, participants are expected to read all of the papers in advance, to attend all of the sessions, and to come prepared for discussion. You should only submit or volunteer if you plan on reading all of the papers in advance and attending all of the sessions.

There are four ways to participate in the BayFAP: (1) have your paper selected for the program; (2) be a chair or commentator; (3) referee; (4) be part of the USF or Sac State philosophy departments.

Conference attendance is limited to those on the program, organizers, referees, and members of the University of San Francisco Philosophy Department and the Sacramento State Philosophy Department (i.e., faculty and students). This is due to funding and logistical constraints, together with the fact that the BayFAP is a workshop-style conference that involves in-depth discussions of works-in-progress.

TO SUBMIT A PAPER

Papers must be submitted in PDF format, and prepared for anonymous review. Please include a cover page with the following information:

The title of your paper
Your name and contact information
An abstract
Word count (including all notes and bibliography)
Email your paper to bayfapworkshop at gmail dot com. The subject line of your email should read: BayFAP 2019 Submission.

The conference does not have any specific theme or topic. We will consider submissions in any area of feminist philosophy, broadly construed. The strict word limit is 8,000 words, but shorter papers (under 8000 words) have a better chance of being accepted. Do not submit published work, or work for which you wouldn’t be able to incorporate feedback from BayFAP in any subsequent published version. Authors will be notified of the organizers’ decisions by late January, 2019.

Philosophers who are unable to travel to San Francisco due to immigration restrictions or mobility issues are nevertheless invited to submit papers. If your paper is selected, we will be happy to discuss the possibility of arranging remote participation via Zoom. (There is no need to flag this with your submission. You can let us know on acceptance.)

TO VOLUNTEER

You can also participate in BayFAP by volunteering to referee, chair, and/or comment. You do not have to submit a paper in order to volunteer. Volunteer referees should be willing and able to read up to five papers in their areas of expertise between December 15, 2018 and January 15, 2019.

Referees will be notified in early December. Chairs and commentators will be notified in early February 2019.

To volunteer at BayFAP please email bayfapworkshop at gmail dot com. If you are also submitting a paper, please send a separate email indicating your interest in being a BayFAP volunteer.

The subject line of your email should read: BayFAP 2019 Volunteer. Your email should include:

Your name
Your contact information
Your AOS and AOCs
The roles for which you would like to volunteer (i.e., referee, chair, and/or comment)
FINANCIAL AID

BayFAP is sponsored by the Fleischacker Fund for Philosophy at the University of San Francisco. We have a (very!) limited budget to assist with costs for participants who lack access to research funding.

Relaunch: Simone de Beauvoir Studies

Announcing the relaunch of Simone de Beauvoir Studies!

Simone de Beauvoir Studies (SdBS) is currently accepting submissions. Please find more information including the call for papers for the first special issue, “Beauvoir in Conversation,” and a call for guest editors at http://www.brill.com/sdbs. SdBS is a peer-reviewed multidisciplinary journal dedicated to advancing scholarship relevant to the writings, thinking, and legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. SdBS places particular emphasis on recognizing diverse social, cultural, and disciplinary receptions of Beauvoir’s thought and on featuring cutting-edge approaches to the investigation of her oeuvre. In addition to articles that discuss Beauvoir’s writings directly, the journal publishes pieces that connect to central themes in Beauvoir’s oeuvre such as gender, race, sexuality, literary theory, and global politics. Articles are published in English and French.

An institutional subscription to SdBS will give students and faculty on your campus electronic access not only to the current volume of the journal (Vol. 30, Spring and Fall 2019), but also to all 29 previously published volumes of SdBS (1983-2013). To order , ask your librarian to contact brillna@turpin-distribution.com 844-232-3707 (toll free) or 860-350-0041 (for orders in North and South America) or brill@turpin-distribution.com +44 (0) 1767 604-954 (for orders in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia).

CFA for CSWIP2019: Feminism and Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

 

Women and Autism

Autism is much more frequentlly diagnosed in males than in females.  An article in the British Psychological Psychological Association’s journal suggests the underlying difference lies in a crucial distingushing feature.  To invoke the cliches of the syndrome:  autistic males are loners who lack intuitive understanding of the neuro-typicals’ actions and reactions.  Autistic women, on the other hand, have the same. lack of intuitive understanding, but they have a much stronger desire for social relations.

On this account, autistic women lack the skills to fulfill a fundamental desire they have.  They may learn to compensate for their intuitive lack.  However, I would suppose that getting help is very difficult for them.  Therapists won’t be prepared to see the problems they have.

 

ADDITION: Books to be translated for chinese faculty and students: nominations open

What wouuld you recommend?

Let’s suppose we’re aiming for a good sized list.  Let us know which would be your candidates.

 

Thoughtful comments made me realize I left out two important facts:

  •  What’s needed are philosophy books by women.
  • I think the idea is to have books from philosophy specifically.  Books that also involve another discipline are fine, but only if they are recognizably philosophy books.

 

Women and academic careers

When individuals could decide quite openly that one would not have an academic career.

The Woman Who Loves Giraffes (2018)

Plot

  • In1956, four years before Jane Goodall ventured into the world of chimpanzees and seven years before Dian Fossey left to work with mountain gorillas, in fact, before anyone, man or woman had made such a trip, 23-year old Canadian biologist, Anne Innis Dagg, made an unprecedented solo journey to South Africa to become the first person in the world to study animal behavior in the wild on that continent. When she returned home a year later armed with ground-breaking research, the insurmountable barriers she faced as a female scientist proved much harder to overcome. In 1972, having published 20 research papers as an assistant professor of zoology at University of Guelph, the Dean of the university, denied her tenure. She couldn’t apply to the University of Waterloo because the Dean there told Anne that he would never give tenure to a married woman. This was the catalyst that transformed Anne into a feminist activist. For three decades, Anne Innis Dagg was absent from the giraffe world until 2010 when she was sought out by giraffologists and not just brought back to into the fold, but finally celebrated for her work.

  • Dr. Anne Innis Dagg re-traces the steps of her groundbreaking 1956 journey to South Africa to study giraffes in the wild – and discovers a startling contrast between the world of giraffes she once knew and the one it has become. Weaving through the past and present, her harrowing journey gives us an intimate look into the factors that destroyed her career and the forces that brought her back.

Women in Ireland worry: does wearing a thong mean you can’t be raped?

This issue is not exactly protection, unless one sees the (alleged) rapist as protected:

Rape trial sparks thong protests in Ireland

A teenager’s underwear was used as evidence that she might be sexually promiscuous during a recent rape trial in the Irish city of Cork. “You have to look at the way she was dressed,” the accused lawyer’s said of the complainant. “She was wearing a thong with a lace front.” The 27-year-old man accused was subsequently found not guilty. The trial triggered protests across Ireland this week. Many women carried items of underwear and chanted slogans like “My little black dress does not mean yes.” Women also posted pictures of their underwear on social media with hashtags #IBelieveHer and #ThisIsNotConsent.