Oxford Bibliographies Online

A couple of questions, which I hope others will also find interesting:

1.  Have you used an Oxford Online Bibliography?  If so, what did you think of it?  I’ve just looked at the related ebook** one can get for the kindle; the one I have covers a lot of topics, but the bibliographical entries under each strike me as pretty scant.  The Standford Encyclopedia entries seem much more useful.  What do you think?

2.  Does your library have a subscription to them?  If so, do you have any sense of their usefulness in that form, as opposed to the things one can get through Amazon?  (As far as I can tell, my library doesn’t, but it has recently become very updated and supposedly user-friendly, and I really can’t tell anymore whether the absence of an entry means the corresponding absence of what I’m searching for.)

3.  Do you have any idea of how the representation of women looks generally  in the Oxford philosophy bibliographies?  There are a number of bibliographies in traditional philosophy.

**Here’s what Amazon tells us about the relation between the ebook and the online material:

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of social work find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study Philosophy. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit http://www.oxfordbibligraphies.com.This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of social work find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study Philosophy. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibligraphies.com.

This leads me to think the online material might be richer than that of the ebook I have, which itself may not be representative of the series.  Hence, the questions above.

5 thoughts on “Oxford Bibliographies Online

  1. I’m eager to hear feedback on this question, as I’ve just signed on to write an entry for one of these bibliographies. Haven’t used them yet, because the one for my discipline is currently Under Construction.

  2. The bibliography in my immediate research interests seems to be just getting under way, but the remarkable prevalence of male bibliographers jumps to the eye.

  3. MA: I noticed that; it is worrying and the comment by Anon confirms the worry for Metaphysics.

    I wonder if we should start adding presses to the gendered conference campaign. Also, I wonder if there’s some way to get clerical support for a bibliography of women philosophers.

    Anon, thanks. I suppose one shouldn’t be surprised, given their metaphysics series. Still, it does shock one to see it fully realized.

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