Gender pay gap: when it’s a plus for him and a minus for her.

Inside higher education has some grim news about faculty salaries, especially in public universities, though with some exceptions.  But they also look at a study of gender equity in salaries for faculty that claims it exists even when we correct for longer times spent on the job, etc.   They have an example that’s new to me for the strange category with entries that can count for one sex but against the other.  For example, having lots of undegraduates hanging around to see you can show that he is popular and motivating, while they show she is unable to make effiient use of her class period.  That’s one I’ve made up, but this one is for real:

By using information in the database about how faculty members use their time, Meyers also suggests that some activities that both men and women perform seem to have different results. For instance, men who spend significant time on professional service activities that are not based at their institution (say, working with a disciplinary group) do not see any negative impact on their salaries. Women, however, see a consistent, negative impact on their salaries from similar contributions to their professions.

The two links above take you to two different articles; the second has a number of interesting points about gender, pay and prestige.

If you have one of those lists of things that benefit him but not her (or vice versa) please think of sharing it with us!