Finally, Someone Asks How Men Balance a Career & Family

From Inside Higher Ed: “Male Scientist Balancing Act”

Numerous studies have focused on how women in academic science balance their quest for career advancement with their family responsibilities. A study released here at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (by researchers who have done considerable research on women in science) turns to male scientists, and asks how they balance work and home responsibilities.

The scholars conducted in-depth interviews with 74 physicists and biologists who are graduate students or faculty members at prestigious universities, and the results illustrate options that male scientists have that many female scientists who have or want children lack.

[…]

Some of those interviewed expressed awareness of how they benefited [from having stay at home wives]. “For me it’s a little easier because I have a wife that has stayed home and taken care of [the children]. I imagine it would be much much more challenging if I didn’t have a spouse that was planning on staying home,” said one.

But others seemed decidedly less sympathetic to the impact of their choices. Asked, “Do you think that having children then is difficult to manage with being a scientist?” one physicist said, “No, absolutely not. That’s why you have a wife.”

Emphasis mine.

P.S. The title of this post contains at least 25% snark.

4 thoughts on “Finally, Someone Asks How Men Balance a Career & Family

  1. I still think that it’s really important to have this study, if only to show further the disparity in genders in academe (and particularly science). We already had oodles of data, but it’s great that the (apparently) first study to look into how men balance work and life shows exactly what has been conjectured (and, I’d say, strongly supported) by the data on studying women.

    “But others seemed decidedly less sympathetic to the impact of their choices. Asked, “Do you think that having children then is difficult to manage with being a scientist?” one physicist said, “No, absolutely not. That’s why you have a wife.””

    That quote is just *gold*!

  2. I didn’t mean to imply that this sort of study isn’t important; only that it seems like it’s the first of its kind (which I hope isn’t in fact true.)

Comments are closed.