Feminist porn awards and conference

Whatever your views on pornography, if you’re teaching and writing about porn it’s time to pay attention to all of the feminist work that’s being done in this area. You might disagree about its value, you might wonder what counts as feminist, but what’s not on any longer is to talk about pornography as if it were only made by men for men.

April in Toronto means it’s time for the Feminist Porn Awards.  This year it’s the 8th annual Feminist Porn Awards. If you’ve never been I highly recommend it. here is also an academic conference attached to the main event, the awards ceremony.

Here is what Good for Her has to say about founding and  sponsoring the awards:

“But wait, what is feminism doing getting into bed with porn? At Good For Her, we are feminists and we sell and rent porn. In 2006 we decided that it’s not enough to criticize adult films for not adequately representing the diversity of women’s, trans folk’s- and in many cases, men’s – sexuality. So we decided to do something about it. As porn star and performance artist Annie Sprinkle famously said, “The answer to bad porn isn’t no porn…it’s to try and make better porn!”  Good For Her couldn’t agree more.  We acknowledge that what one person finds “bad porn”, another may enjoy. We believe that the world is inundated with cheesy, cliche, degrading, and patronizing porn with little diversity.  But we also believe that erotic fantasy is powerful, and that women and marginalized communities who do not identify with the mainstream offerings deserve to put their dreams and desires on film, too.  As feminists and sex-positive people, we want to showcase and honour those who are creating erotic media with a feminist sensibility that differs from what porn typically offers.

Good For Her wants porn to be held to a high standard. We all deserve to see artistic expressions that celebrate the diversity of who we are in all our glory, and artists deserve to have their work recognized. For these reasons, and many more, we are honoured to be the presenter and founders of the Annual Good For Her Feminist Porn Awards.”

 

Here’s the links:

Good For Her Feminist Porn Awards, April 4th-6th, 2013

Conference Registration

Information on speakers

8 thoughts on “Feminist porn awards and conference

  1. Thanks for posting!

    Feminist porn seems to have made lots of contributions lately, for good and (sometimes) for ill. But I don’t see much discussion in the philosophical literature. Among other things, feminist porn challenges certain normative definitions of porn, particularly those that define pornography in terms of harm. If trying to analyze pornography as a social phenomenon, those definitions seem to have outlived their usefulness (though maybe they are still useful for certain narrower purposes). Ann Garry wrote a good article about a decade ago where she recognized some of these things, and (quite wisely, I think) advocated using a more descriptive definition of pornography. It was in an anthology, but the name of the article escapes me at the moment.

    That’s how I read the score, anyway.

  2. Wait — it’s April in Toronto?
    Canadian spring forward with more gusto than we do, I guess.

  3. I’m a journalist and the founder of Girl Boner, and am really hoping to attend the conference. In either case, I’ll be keeping an eye out for your posts. Wishing you a wonderful event!

  4. This is an interesting and important topic for those of us who are feminist or pro-feminist, and who are concerned about everyone living non-oppressively and non-oppressed. It occurs to me that one of the actual common objections to Hetero porn per se, is that women are not and should not be sexually assertive. But women are sexually assertive, and some enjoy making porn, as some enjoy professional sexual surrogacy (prostitution). These are complex social issues. I don’t think it helps to make broad judgments either way, and it appears that we are beginning to wake-up about these complex nature of oppression and non-oppression. Do we further oppress women by communicating to them that they should not be sexually assertive. This is only one possible framing. There are many others. Is sex dirty (oppressive) outside of marriage or other commitment? How patriarchal and oppressive is that notion? Are those who are opposed to Hetero porn per se also opposed to the idea/practice of recreational sex? I am Gay. I ask myself if Homo porn per se is oppressive and demeaning to men. Thanks, Nick

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