The Scar Project: breast cancer is not a pink ribbon

The best explanation of the scar project comes with the second link below. I’ll try to give some background first.

Breast Cancer in young women is very worrying. The statistics put the chances of death within the standard 5 and 10 year markers quite high when compared to the rates of death in older women. In addition to this very scary fact, a cancer victim, young or old, typically ends up with surgery and other treatments, such as radiation, and may be left seriously scarred and even infertile. For many cancer victims, the cancer is fueled by estrogen, and it may make sense in some cases to have one’s ovaries removed.

Nonetheless, the beauty and dignity of cancer victims is very obvious, as the scar project is meant to show us in the young victims of this disease. I am going to link to an NY Times article and a clip about the project. There is also a video from youtube.You’ll be looking at the aftermath of surgery. Some women have had lumpectomies and others mastectomies. You may find the pictures difficult to look at, though my own squeamish self had no problem at all. Still, it seemed better to link to these pictures.

NYTimes article by Susan Gubar,

Clip linked to from the NYT,

Youtube

5 thoughts on “The Scar Project: breast cancer is not a pink ribbon

  1. NotDownOrOut, I agree. I met a lot of women outside radiology at MD Anderson; I thought they were very beautiful. Part of what was so impressive was the sense one got that they understood what was important and what their lives were about (to some extent).

    I’ve been reading bits and pieces from your wonderful blog. I hope it will become a book.

  2. […] The Scar Project: breast cancer is not a pink ribbon | Feminist … The best explanation of the scar project comes with the second link below. I'll try to give some background first. Breast Cancer in young women is very worrying. The statistics put the chances of death within the standard 5 and . […]

  3. Feminists have branded breast cancer as a “young woman’s disease” in order to continue gaining more funding for breast cancer. However, the fact is, the majority of breast cancer victims are over the age of 60. Please stop spreading myths about this disease. It is not fair to anyone. Although it CAN strike young women, it is not typically a common disease of women in their 20s and 30s.

  4. Flon, I’m not quite sure why you think that ‘feminists’ have branded breast cancer as a young woman’s disease? There isn’t one feminist stance or view on anything, let alone breast cancer. This post talks about the challenges facing young women who develop breast cancer, which can be different to those facing older women. To acknowledge these differences and draw attention to them isn’t to brand it a young women’s disease.

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