Stereotype threat: scaling up the interventions

Great stuff.

For example:

A controlled, incremental and systematic approach to the application of interventions is a possible path to scaling up interventions. For example, PERTS(http://www.perts.net/home/PERTS.php), created by doctoral students Dave Paunesku and Carissa Romero of the Department of Psychology at Stanford University, features such an approach. This method uses the Internet to deliver interventions to students. Teachers volunteer to have their students go to computer terminals to complete the interventions in a standardized fashion on designated days. As the procedure for delivering the interventions is highly controlled, the treatment message is given as intended, minimizing the potential for error. Interventions delivered in this manner have yielded reliable increases in GPA in studies of thousands of students across the country—particularly for low-performing ones.

Constructing the Myth of the Crack Baby

Ta Nehisi Coates has a short blurb about about the crack baby ‘epidemic’ in the early 1980s in the US.  You can also watch a ten minute video / short documentary about it here.

pic
a pregnant woman with one hand resting on her belly.

Coates mentions the influence of racism in how women were being prosecuted for being pregnant while addicted to cocaine. In fact, there’s a whole confluence of racism, classism, misogyny, and ableism that feed into the crack baby hysteria:
–the racism and classism that goes into poor WoC being more easily seen as irresponsible mothers who were recklessly endangering their unborn children
–the general misogyny that a woman’s health (like helping her with her addiction) is not nearly as important as the health of the her unborn child (so she should be prosecuted for potentially harming it.)
–the ableism that influence our standards of health.  Part of the hysteria was that babies would be born with physical and cognitive disabilities, which not only lead us to think of them as not being fully human, but we were then also concerned about all the extra money they disabled kids would cost us.  Because you know, the *tragedy* here is not that there are a bunch of women addicted to a dangerous drug, but that people’s taxes will go up from from all these costly, disabled babies.

Eek, it’s like a messed-up game of “spot how the -ism influences our moral concerns.”

Ever lay for two months staring at the ceiling?i

That’s what pregnancy might have landed you with. The alternative, your doctors said, was the possible death of you and ‘the baby.’ That’s quite a motivator.

Well, all that may have been unnecessary.

Of course, if you are pregnant, your doctors may fell entitled to disregard the rest of your life in deciding treatment. The rational use of probabilities can go out the door.

NOTE:

The article does not list pre-eclamsia as not really requiring bed rest. High blood pressure is one sign of pre-eclamsia, but there’s more to it:
G

Eclampsia (described above). [ajj: life threatening stroke]
Liver, kidney, and lung problems.
A blood clotting disorder.
Bleeding into the brain (a stroke).
Severe bleeding from the afterbirth (placenta).
HELLP syndrome. This occurs in about 1 in 5 women who have severe pre-eclampsia. HELLP stands for ‘haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets’, which are some of the medical features of this severe form of pre-eclampsia. Haemolysis means that your blood cells start to break down. Elevated liver enzymes means that your liver has become affected. Low platelets means that the number of platelets in your blood is low and you are at risk of serious bleeding problems, as the platelets work to help your blood to clot.

Don’t mess with pre-eclamsia. Paid maternity remains VERY important, for this and other reasons.

CFP: Society for Analytical Feminism at Central APA

SAF Session at the Central Division APA

February 26-March 1, 2014

Palmer House Hilton, Chicago IL

The Society for Analytical Feminism invites submissions for a session at the 2014 Central Division APA meetings.

The Society seeks papers that examine feminist issues by methods broadly construed as analytic, or discuss the use of analytic philosophical methods as applied to feminist issues. Reading time should be about 20 minutes. Authors should submit either  (1) a paper, or (2) an extended abstract, as detailed as possible (up to 1000 words) accompanied by a bibliography. Please delete all self-identifying references from your submission to ensure anonymity.

 Send submissions as a word attachment to Robin Dillon:

rsd2 [at] lehigh [dot] edu

Deadline for submissions: August 1, 2013.

Graduate students or underfunded professionals whose papers are accepted will be eligible for the Society’s $250 Travel Stipend. Please indicate on a separate page (or in your covering letter) if you fall into one of these categories.

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The Society for Analytical Feminism provides a forum where issues concerning analytical feminism may be openly discussed and examined. Its purpose is to promote the study of issues in feminism by methods broadly construed as analytic, to examine the use of analytic methods as applied to feminist issues, and to provide a means by which those interested in Analytical Feminism may meet and exchange ideas. The Society meets yearly at the Central Division meetings of the APA and frequently organizes sessions for the Eastern Division and Pacific Divisions.

Membership in the Society is open to all who are interested in and concerned with issues in Analytical Feminism. Annual dues are $25 for regularly employed members, $15 for students, unemployed, underemployed, and retired members.

6 Women Scientists Who Were Snubbed Due to Sexism

6 Women Scientists Who Were Snubbed Due to Sexism (by Jane J. Lee, 5/19/13, for National Geographic Daily News)

“Despite enormous progress in recent decades, women still have to deal with biases against them in the sciences.”

“…Today’s women scientists believe that attitudes have changed, said Laura Hoopes at Pomona College in California, who has written extensively on women in the sciences—’until it hits them in the face’.” Bias against female scientists is less overt, but it has not gone away.

Here are six female researchers who did groundbreaking work—and whose names are likely unfamiliar for one reason: because they are women…”


Just some of (unfortunately many,) many relevant FP posts:

Minimal Posters – Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Lost Women of Science

Professor Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell