“a new, thoroughly non-Cartesian framework by which to approach large theoretical issues”

Well, I just found the Choice review below. Let me stress that a lot of people played very significant roles in this project. It could not have been otherwise:

Neurofeminism: issues at the intersection of feminist theory and cognitive science, ed. by Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson, and Heidi Lene Maibom. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. 28410 bibl index ISBN 9780230296732, $90.00

This volume of essays is about neurofeminism and so much more. Though feminist-oriented philosophy of science informs much of the text, the work is far more demonstrative of the revolutionary effect that the neurosciences have had on traditional discourse in the study of cultural history, ethics, and science. The interdisciplinary and international authors make this collection truly one of a kind. In addition to establishing a new, thoroughly non-Cartesian framework by which to approach large theoretical issues, this volume also takes a deep, critical dive into such practical issues as reductionism, the limitations associated with brain imaging technology, and the popular belief that there are “essential” differences between male and female brains. In the end, the empirical, methodological, and conceptual inadequacies of some firmly entrenched thinking about self and other are unraveled. This is a remarkable read that lives up to its placement in the series “New Directions in Philosophy and Cognitive Science,” edited by John Protevi and Michael Wheeler. Good bibliography. Summing Up: Highly recommended. *** Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers.–H. Storl, Augustana College (IL)

Storl, H.

Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition)
Storl, H. “Neurofeminism: issues at the intersection of feminist theory and cognitive science.” CHOICE: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries Mar. 2013: 1261. Literature Resource Center. Web. 19 Dec. 2013.
Document URL
http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA320423066&v=2.1&u=txshracd2588&it=r&p=LitRC&sw=w&asid=aff898ddeb82b8d06618e0f903e44d07

6 thoughts on ““a new, thoroughly non-Cartesian framework by which to approach large theoretical issues”

  1. Thanks, Jenny. It was surprising to me to see that some of the words and phrases were very close to part of a grant I wrote (with a great deal of help) for the initial funding of our center. That was in 1996, when it seemed clear that cognitive neuroscience was going to be a very big deal culturally, and needed some critical attention, by which I don’t mean “negative attention.”

  2. Meant to add: it is very exciting to see a project end up with a virtue that is the product of many people’s effort.

  3. Comment removed by moderator

    Sorry, M-R-I, but the allegation made in the previous comment is so problematic that it is potentially damaging for it to appear even in a questioning or denial of it.

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