Iranian mathematician becomes first woman to receive the Fields Medal

Mathematician Maryam Mizrakhani, originally from Iran and now at Stanford, is one of four winners of this year’s Fields Medal – and the first woman to ever receive the award. The Fields Medal is generally considered the most prestigious professional award in mathematics.

Nature reports:

A native of Iran, Maryam Mirzakhani is at Stanford University in California. She won for her work on “the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces.”

“Perhaps Maryam’s most important achievement is her work on dynamics,” says Curtis McMullen of Harvard University. Many natural problems in dynamics, such as the three-body problem of celestial mechanics (for example, interactions of the Sun, the Moon and Earth), have no exact mathematical solution. Mirzakhani found that in dynamical systems evolving in ways that twist and stretch their shape, the systems’ trajectories “are tightly constrained to follow algebraic laws”, says McMullen.

He adds that Mirzakhani’s achievements “combine superb problem-solving ability, ambitious mathematical vision and fluency in many disciplines, which is unusual in the modern era, when considerable specialization is often required to reach the frontier”.

3 thoughts on “Iranian mathematician becomes first woman to receive the Fields Medal

  1. Reblogged this on 23lenses and commented:
    Yes, Yes Yes! I was in a math curriculum training yesterday and was asked to describe what a mathematician looked like. Instantly, my mind jumped to Albert Einstein in a white lab coat standing at the board explaining his equation E=MC^2; the rest of my colleagues gave similar descriptions. This is a big deal for our generation and the ones that come after ours, as the need for scholars, diverse in gender and color, in the field of STEM are necessary to progress our nation and inspire our future. I wonder if Maryam Mizrakhani knows that she just broke the glass ceiling for women in her field and beyond.

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