APA Good practice Guide II

Academics may be right to worry about new things introduced in the summer, when it can be hard to get a good critical response. But we can still take action.

The APA has introduced its good practices guide and we need to discuss it. As you will see, there are only two people commenting on the blog, and one of them is going to stop unless more people join in. Please help!

One set of comments is here:
http://blog.apaonline.org/2017/07/18/apa-good-practices-guide-public-discussion-series-about-the-guide-and-how-to-use-it/

There is now a Part Two that has been started.

During the public comment period, which will last through spring 2018, we encourage you to read the draft Good Practices Guide and share your thoughts, questions, and concerns about its contents. To facilitate broader discussion about the Good Practices Guide, the APA Blog is running a series of posts covering each section of the guide in detail (the first of which will be posted on the blog today), and listening sessions will be held at each of the three divisional meetings in 2018. You can also send feedback and suggestions directly to goodpracticesguide@apaonline.org.

Women, Excellence, and Competition

Susan Chira has an article at the NYT about women’s experience in business, the possible connection to barriers in politics, and what some of those structural barriers to high status positions seem to be.

“Why Women Aren’t C.E.O.s, According to Women Who Almost Were: It’s not a pipeline problem. It’s about loneliness, competition and deeply rooted barriers.”

“In recounting their experiences, some women were philosophical; several swung between barely suppressed fury and bouts of self-blame. “

The article also contains what might be the crowning glory of Dunning-Kruger anecdotes:

“Many women, accomplished as they are, don’t feel the same sense of innate confidence as their male peers. Gerri Elliott, a former senior executive at Juniper Networks (who said she did not personally encounter bias), recounts a story related by a colleague: A presenter asked a group of men and women whether anyone had expertise in breast-feeding. A man raised his hand. He had watched his wife for three months. The women in the crowd, mothers among them, didn’t come forward as experts.”

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