CFP: Resistant Imaginations

University of Oregon
Eugene, OR, United States, February 1-2, 2019

In The Epistemology of Resistance, José Medina points to the importance of addressing not only actions and practices but also language and the imagination when fighting oppression. We are often keen to challenge or call out exclusionary and stigmatizing aspects of the social imaginary, a process that centers around negation. Yet imagination and the social imaginary will never be replaced by some strict notion of reason/truth, so we must also consider positive steps for creating alternative imaginaries or critical reimaginings, ways of “calling in” – we must cultivate imaginative practices. With her concept of epistemic gathering, for example, Gaile Pohlhaus Jr, asks us to imagine new ways of creating communities across difference that disrupt inherited colonial practices.

For this intimate conference we are seeking papers/presentations that elaborate or instantiate resistant imaginations or related concepts (whether drawn from Medina’s work or other sources).

Though hosted by philosophers interested in Critical Epistemology we welcome papers, presentations, and workshops from any academic discipline and from outside the academy. We especially encourage work that crosses traditional boundaries—disciplinary and academic/non-academic, among others—to expose how issues of disability, gender, race, socioeconomic status, and other areas of difference shape our understandings of the world.

Invited Speakers:

José Medina (Northwestern University)

Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr (Miami University, Ohio)

Submission link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ri2019

Submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Submission Guidelines:

The following submission categories are welcome:

Extended Abstract (500 words or less) describing a paper who presentation would take no more than 20 minutes.

Non-Paper Proposal (500 words or less) describing a presentation, performance or workshop. Longer timeframes may be considered.

You are permitted one submission. Please provide a title, select 3-10 topics/keywords, and attach a 500-word abstract/proposal as a PDF or Word document. Please do not include any identifying information in your abstract.

Organizers:

Camisha Russell
Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy
camishar@uoregon.edu

Kit Connor
Accessibility Contact
kconnor@uoregon.edu

Additional Information:

The conference will be relatively small with no concurrent sessions. Registration is required, but there is no registration fee.

Information about lodging, including ADA guest rooms, will be available closer to the date.

Guidance on making presentations accessible will be provided to presenters on notification of acceptance of a submission.

Vital resources on sexual misconduct in academia

The 1752 Group, a wonderful UK lobbying group on sexual misconduct in higher education, has just released two rich, important resources that everyone interested in these issues should read and engage with.

First, they have a detailed report on the experiences of students and early career people who are victims of misconduct by staff. The report discusses both their experiences of misconduct, and their experiences with the reporting and adjudication systems of universities. It carefully outlines the many widespread failings in these systems, and the devastating effects of these failings.

Next, they’ve worked with one of the leading law firms on sexual harassment (both in the US and UK), McAllister Olivarius, to offer recommendations for improving these systems.

Everyone should read both of these, and they can be downloaded here.

Kate Manne on himpathy

It could not be more timely.

When it comes to the moral deficiencies exhibited by Mr. Trump and other supporters of the judge, many critics speak about lack of empathy as the problem. It isn’t. Mr. Trump, as he has shown clearly in the Kavanaugh confirmation process, seems to have no difficulty taking another person’s perspective, and then feeling and expressing a sympathetic or congruent moral emotion.

The real problem is that the people Mr. Trump feels with and for are most frequently powerful men who have been credibly accused of serious crimes and wrongdoing. He felt sorry for Michael Flynn, referring to him as a “good guy.” More recently, he felt bad for Paul Manafort. And, in the case of Judge Kavanaugh, Mr. Trump feels sorry for a man accused of sexual assault while erasing and dismissing the perspective of his female accusers.

Read the whole thing.