These men are NOT saving room for cats!

Irritated by the seemingly inexplicable behavior of men who spread their legs wide whem sitting in public spaces? Feeling forced to collapse in on yourself?

Here we’ve enjoyed laughing at the phenomenon and the idea that they are making room for cats.


However, what may be going on is a quite serious and quite deep reinforcement of differences valued by patriarchy.

We’ve known for some time that one’s facial expressions can affect one’s mood, but according to the NY Times, Amy Cuddy (assoc prof, Harvard Business School), has shown one’s stance and how much space one occupies affects how powerful one feels and conveys. People spread out on the subway wil feel more powerful than thoses crunched up. Before an interview you will be more confident if you’ve been practiccing wonderwoman poses

Lately, she has been examining the differences between subjects who sleep sprawled out versus those who curl up. Early results show that people who arise with arms and legs extended feel brighter and more optimistic than the 40 percent who start the day in a fetal position.

But there’s hope. “If you wake in fetal pose,” Ms. Cuddy said, “open yourself up like the guy on the subway taking up too much space, and soon enough you’ll feel like a happy warrior.”

The Sunday Cat is certain that cats rule

and she has recent compelling evidence. Two kittens recently closed down sections of NYC’s metro for hours. (Or nearly hours.) That requires some sort of power.

But let us first realize that a strange hesitation has gripped her. She’s afraid that she’s becoming a cliche, which would be quite awful. What do you think? Perhaps she should retire??

Back to the kittens, from CBS News online:

It only took two kittens to stop the city’s subway in its tracks.

Power was cut to the B and Q lines in Brooklyn for more than an hour after a woman reported Thursday morning that her kittens were loose in the nation’s largest subway system, transit officials said.

The furry felines, one black and the other white with gray stripes, were finally found on the tracks and rescued about seven hours later.

How they got there was a mystery. But they were seen running dangerously close to the high-voltage third rail.

Their owner rushed to a subway station with cat food for transit workers dispatched onto the tracks to use to try to corral them.

Power was suspended between several stops — about half the Q line and the B line’s entire service in Brooklyn — on the local and express tracks for 90 minutes, Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokeswoman Judie Glave said. The express line was stopped another half-hour while workers kept searching.

But the skittish kittens disappeared again before being discovered Thursday evening under the third rail of an above-ground express track. Police officers removed the kittens in crates, Glave said.

The Sunday Cat on the recent attacks on cats

To hear people talk and see what they write, one would think that cats are nature’s most serious threat. But does it seem likely that cats really do engage in the horrible rounds of killing they are aleged to participate in? For example,

We estimate that free-ranging domestic cats kill 1.4–3.7 billion birds and 6.9–20.7 billion mammals annually. … Our findings suggest that free-ranging cats… are likely the single greatest source of anthropogenic mortality for US birds and mammals. Scientifically sound conservation and policy intervention is needed to reduce this impact.

One person is even urging New Zealand to get rid of all its cats.
But these feral cats do not look so dangerous (the accent, btw, is Austin, Texas):



and still less does this dear one:



For a sensible response to this irresponsible character assination, do go here. Thanks, KT.

The sunday cat extols the virtues of guard cats

Many thnks to EB.

“The Hermitage Museum hires “Guard Cats” to protect artwork.

The team of tailed guards consists mainly of alley cats, and like in the imperial times, the cat community hinges on strict hierarchy. The cats fall into aristocrats, the middle caste, and the low caste. Each group operates within a certain designated part of the building. The cat staff cannot exceed 50-60 cats, not because they’ll be difficult to look after in terms of cat food. If the number of cats exceeds 60, they start cat fights and neglect their duties. For this reason, from time to time, the museum has to look for people who would adopt extra cats.

The felines are carefully named by museum employees based on their personalities. They even have their own holiday on March 28, where they receive special treats.”