“Too many wheelchairs”

That was the judgment of the CBP (Customs and Border Patrol) supervisor last evening at George Bush Intercontinental Airport.  “They can go through the lines like everybody else.”  So they closed the booth dedicated to processing people in wheelchairs, though later opened it up to the general public, approximately 99.5% of whom were not in wheel chairs.

I arrived at the figure above from the simple fact that there were about 500 people in line before me and no one else was in a wheel chair.

It is quite possible that there would have been wheel chair assisted passengers had they closed the special booth earlier, instead of right before me.  But I had spent about 30 min waiting to be assisted through customs, and I didn’t see anyone get help before me.  That was what made made the roughly one hour processing so painful; I wasn’t pushing myself, and the woman who was should have been able to get back to others.

So if you ever get the idea that it would be easier and quicker to get wheel chair assistance, let me say that is not my experience at Heathrow or Bush Intercontinental.  There are several points at which one sits around for 15-45 minutes waiting for someone to be free to help you. These add up.

Still, I resisted snarling at someone who got a wheel chair clearly destined for me, ‘Do you have a card?’ while waving my authorization.

And I remain amazed that we have yet another case of the fairly careless assumption that people with needs are seen as trying just to avoid what everyone else copes with. In comparison, the TSA’s response to my setting off alarms (artificial knee) was exemplary.

(In case you are wondering, let me say that my knee replacement surgery went as well as could be expected, but if you haven’t been walking properly for 3 years, coping with long distances and long lines requires more recovery time than I have had so far. This trip was almost too soon after surgery.)
 

Hot girls in wheelchairs

A new “reality” program about the lives of a group of young female wheelchair users will be debuting in April on the Sundance Channel (Huffpost has details here.) “Push Girls” (yes, really) aims to give viewers:

“an unscripted look into the lives of four gorgeous ladies who became disabled after enduring tragic car accidents or debilitating diseases”

and:

“an uncensored glimpse at what it means to be sexy, ambitious and living with paralysis”

For starters, I should say that it’s a good thing if there’s more mainstream awareness of the full, rich, non-tear-jerking lives led by so many disabled people. And insofar as programs like this work toward that goal, it’s likewise a good thing. So I’ll tune in with interest. But there’s so much not to like about the way this program is being pitched. My biggest pet peeves:

(1) Why do the women have to be young and conventionally hot? Surely the best way to overcome the stereotypes of disabled people as sexless or unattractive is to challenge our starting assumption of what sexy, attractive bodies can look like – not get together a bunch of women who look like models who happen to be sitting down. While it’s important to recognize that disabled people can be “hot” by conventional standards, there’s only so far that’s going to toward helping us appreciate non-standard bodies. Disabled bodies are never going to be “normal”. That’s part of their charm.

(2) Just for once, it would be nice to see a mainstream discussion of disability that isn’t laced with “tragic overcomer” rhetoric. Not strong, fearless people bravely facing the tragedy of disability. Not inspiring, motivational people showing us how to persevere against all odds. Just happy, flourishing people who as it happens are disabled.

CFP: Interrogating Disability and Prostheses

Special Issue: Women, Gender & Research, 2020/1

The meaning and significance of bodily differences, norms of embodiment, and imaginaries about (‘proper’) personhood are central problematics within feminist studies, disability studies and feminist bioethics alike. These problematics relate not only to differential experiences and contexts for living particular lives, but also to associated social and institutional power-relations, hierarchies and policies, as well as to the material and technological circumstances that in different ways shape – limit and make possible – different ways of living.

In this Special Issue we invite papers that critically examine diverse phenomena of disability, whether physical or mental, congenital, acquired, or age-related, from feminist perspectives.

In particular, contributors are invited to think critically and creatively about disability in relation to the objects, notions or metaphors of ‘prostheses’. Prostheses can be thought of in relation to a diverse multitude of phenomena – from wheelchairs to hormone replacement therapy – that in different ways shape and reshape not just functionality, but the very fabric of human lives, particularly in the context of disability. In addition, the prosthetic metaphor is operationalized in a wide range of contexts, evoking a blending of human and technology to triumphantly overcome the ‘natural’ limitations of the ‘ordinary’ human body.

The development of increasingly sophisticated technologies that can aid individuals with disability (e.g. high-tech prostheses, brain implants, exo-skeletons, intense pharmaceutical interventions, etc) have changed drastically the modes through which disability is represented and understood in mainstream and alternative cultures. In consequence, the use and/or incorporation of prostheses cannot be read as simply utilitarian and in disability (and similarly in organ transplantation) is often associated with a dysphoria that indicates the difficulties of identity reformation (Sharp 2006; Sobchack 2010; Shildrick 2015). Despite a biomedical reading of prostheses as always therapeutic and often literally life-saving, recipients may tell a different story of how the incorporation of non-self elements into the body can cause disruption in one’s phenomenological experience and therefore to the sense of self – an issue not just about enduring physical discomfort but mental distress that far exceeds the positivist claims made for biotechnological interventions. The patterns of inclusion and exclusion, and categories of normal and abnormal, and natural and artificial, that generally circulate in western societies, contribute further to the ambiguities and contradictions that problematise each act of incorporation.

The Special Issue welcomes contributions that unsettle the familiar certainties of modernist thought by exposing all the gaps, fissures and aporia between the ideal and the actual that render some lives – often those of people with disabilities – unsustainable. Interdisciplinary
approaches and approaches that bring an important gendered dimension to these considerations, as well as analyses of the diverse aspects of social injustice and local and global inequalities as related to health and ability, are particularly encouraged.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
Gendered representations of disability and prostheses
Disability and the posthuman
Gender affirming/transforming prostheses
Neural prostheses
Technologies and materialities of disability
Queering concepts and practices of prostheses and disability
Norms of embodiment, personhood and ‘healthy’ bodies
Disability, crip and feminist theory/methodology
Disability/prostheses and feminist bioethics
Disability policies and inequality

Editors:
Lisa Käll, Associate Professor, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Stockholm University.
Jonathan Mitchell, Ph.D. Student, School of Philosophy, University College Dublin.
Tobias Skiveren, Ph.D. Student, School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University.
Morten H. Bülow, Ph.D., Coordination for Gender Research, University of Copenhagen.

Deadline for abstracts (max 300-word + up to 100 word author bio): February 25, 2019

Deadline for articles: August 25, 2019

All contributions must be in English and should be submitted to: redsek@soc.ku.dk

Guidelines for contributors: http://koensfoeskning.soc.ku.dk/english/kkof/guidelines/

For more information about the journal Women, Gender & Research / Kvinder, Køn & Forskning, see: http://koensfoeskning.soc.ku.dk/kkf or http://koensfoeskning.soc.ku.dk/english/kkof/

CFA for CSWIP2019: Feminism and Food

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism and Food

October 25-27, 2019

University of Guelph

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy. Submissions related to the theme are especially welcome. Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2019. Email cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

Our conference theme is “Feminism and Food.” This conference asks participants to consider how food, as a topic worthy of philosophical investigation, is related to feminist challenges to traditional discourse. How has food been discussed in the history of philosophy, or overlooked? How has feminist philosophical scholarship taken into account issues including the ethics and politics of food production, availability, and consumption? What counts as food, and how are metaphysical claims regarding the nature of food related to our attitudes to animals, to climate, and to cultural geographies?

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

Disability, Feminism, and Food Justice

Food in the Anthropocene

Indigenous Food

Anti-colonial Food Justice

Hunting and/or/versus Farming

Ethical Eating

Feminist Cooking

Hospitality

Diet Culture

Orthorexia

Gender and Gardening

Food Justice and Gender Justice

Food Deserts

Food and Literacy

Women and Food in Media and Marketing

Feeding and Eating With Nonhuman Friends

Please email the 1000 word abstract as a double-spaced document in Word or PDF, prepared for fully anonymous review. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and a few publications, especially those relevant to the event. We encourage all graduate students to indicate if they plan to submit the full versions of their papers for consideration for the 2019 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2019.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.  Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from Guelph will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request. All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential. Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2019 at gmail dot com

 

CFA by March 15: Insiders and Outsiders

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS for CSWIP at Cape Breton University, September 28-30, 2018
Feminist Philosophy: Insiders and Outsiders

 Keynote address: Professor Alice Crary (Oxford), Feminist Theory as an Exercise of Encountering the World Inside Ethics.

We invite papers and panel proposals from all areas of philosophy and philosophical approaches lying within or outside feminist philosophy. While feminist philosophy challenges traditional theoretical methods those challenges can lead to an array of tensions and conflicts within feminist philosophy and between feminist and mainstream philosophy. Within pluralist approaches that may strengthen or reject accepted forms of philosophical critique, who are rendered outsiders and who become insiders? Who can wield forms of power others cannot and who can bring philosophy to new areas of discovery? This conference asks participants to consider how feminist philosophy might further inform or become more informed by traditional and alternative theory and practice. Papers and panels are invited to respond, however broadly, to the following sorts of questions:

• What are the limits of engaging in feminist philosophy? What challenges do feminist philosophical discourse and theory face? How might philosophy become more inclusive of different theoretical approaches, or more protective of established feminist methods? Is there an obligation for philosophers to be inclusive of theoretical or representational diversity?

• What forms of pedagogy enhance or limit feminist philosophy and its aims to recognize and encourage inclusivity? How might technology remove or increase pedagogical obstacles? How best can academics serve as models and mentors to the wider community or to recent and upcoming graduates?

• How should philosophers orient feminist approaches to core philosophical topics and issues? Can feminist philosophy better respond to historical theory and method, or better represent its own history and proponents?

• How can philosophy respond more publicly and proactively toward current pressing moral, social, and political issues such as violence against women, the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry, genocide, infanticide, sexual assault, or other serious threats to girls’ and women’s lives? What empirically grounded approaches might complement or inspire such responsiveness? How can philosophers better respond through social engagement, public policy, or community activism?

• How might feminist philosophy or other critical approaches (e.g. race, disability, or queer theory) challenge the scope of traditional philosophical topics and issues (perhaps through including non-human animals in theorizing or through challenging theory or method in light of practical issues and concerns)?

Abstracts Due: March 15, 2018 (1000w)

Responses to Submissions: April 30, 2018

Conference Date: September 28-30, 2018

Submit to: CSWIPCBU2018 at gmail dot com

  1. Please email the abstract as a double-spaced document in Word, prepared for fully anonymous review.
  2. Rooms are wheelchair accessible. Speakers and panellists will use microphones. There will be a quiet room. Baby change tables are available in washrooms. CART for the keynote address will be provided (additional CART use pending funding and requirement). Childcare is available if needed, please indicate by July 15, 2018.
  3. We encourage all graduate students to submit their papers for consideration for the 2018 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST July 15, 2018.

CFA: Philosophy of Pregnancy, Birth and Early Motherhood (SWIP UK annual conference)

In association with SWIP, BUMP & PHILBIRTH,

University of Southampton

Thursday 21st June – Friday 22nd June 2018

Conference aims

Although philosophers have explored some issues related to pregnancy, birth and early motherhood – most obviously abortion and the value and metaphysics of coming into existence – relatively little philosophical attention has been paid to pregnancy, birth and (early) motherhood themselves. These are remarkable omissions because pregnancy, birth and early motherhood raise many interesting and important philosophical problems in metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, feminism, the philosophy of science, and other areas.

Pregnancy is unlike anything else that a human being experiences. It involves the production of a new person through a deeply intimate process that can radically transform not only the pregnant person’s body, but also their understanding, values, and who and what they take themselves to be. Pregnancy is also the nucleus of a series of unique physiological processes surrounding reproduction: conception; pregnancy; birth; post-natal recovery and breastfeeding. These processes are of great significance for individuals and society. These are key aspects of human life that are under-investigated in philosophy and are often not dealt with adequately by existing ways of thinking, because they do not fit the paradigm of humans as discrete independent individuals with firm boundaries. In these unique physiological processes, the boundaries between human beings are blurred. This may require rethinking key conceptual schemes – or even how we understand human value. This conference will aim to address such issues.

Pregnancy, birth, and early motherhood inescapably involve issues of gender. Most people who undergo these physiological processes are women. Gender expectations contribute to how we understand the duties of pregnant women and mothers. However, not all persons who are pregnant, give birth, or lactate, identify as women or as mothers, and not all mothers experience pregnancy, birth, or lactation. The conference welcomes papers that address the concept of motherhood from a variety of perspectives, including the perspectives of those who have been pregnant but do not identify as mothers, perspectives of those who identify as mothers but have not been pregnant, and trans perspectives.

These issues are not just interesting and important in their own right, but are also relevant to public policy: pregnancy, birth and early motherhood are constant issues of public controversy and policy development. For this reason one of our keynote speakers will talk about policy during the conference. The conference will also host the SWIP annual general meeting and we will organise a practical advice panel on parenting and work-life balance in philosophy.

Invited speakers

Rebecca Schiller (Chief Executive at BirthRights – policy)

Barbara Katz Rothman (City University of New York Graduate Center – sociology)

Maggie Little (Georgetown – ethics)

Sarah LaChance Adams (University of Wisconsin – feminism)

Guy Rohrbaugh (Auburn University – metaphysics)

Elselijn Kingma (University of Southampton – philosophy of science)

Fiona Woollard (University of Southampton – epistemology)

Read More »

Mentoring: Call for Applications

The 4th Biennial Mentoring Workshop for Pre-Tenure Women in Philosophy
June 11 – 13, 2017
University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT

Directors: Louise Antony (U Mass Amherst), Juliet Floyd (Boston University), and Susanne Sreedhar (Boston University)

Local arrangements: Matthew Haber (University of Utah)

Application Deadline: March 1, 2017

The Mentoring Workshop is the centerpiece of the Mentoring Program, an ongoing effort to foster mentoring relationships between senior women in the field and women just beginning their careers. The program follows a model designed by women in the American Economics Association, one which has proven remarkably successful in helping academic women advance their careers. As in past editions, the fourth Mentoring Workshop will involve small-group intensive working sessions interspersed with plenary panel discussions on professional development and work/life issues. The Workshop this year will be hosted by the Philosophy Department of the University of Utah. Information about local arrangements will be available soon, and will be posted on the Mentoring Program website:

http://www.bu.edu/philo/people/faculty/mentoring-project/.

To apply for the workshop: Send an email to Mentoring2017@umass.edu, stating your intention to apply, and indicating at least two areas of specialization, in
ranked order. Include as attachments (in .docx or .pdf format) your CV, and an abstract of the paper you would like to workshop. In choosing a paper to discuss, you should take care to choose a paper that is squarely in the area of philosophy that you work in. [But see the next paragraph.]

We will place you in a mentoring group according to the topic of your paper, and that means that the papers you will read and comment on will also be in that area of philosophy. We will do our best to match members of the cohorts and their mentors,
subject to availability and space in the workshop. That said, if we cannot form a cohort around your primary AOS, we might still be able to offer you a place in a cohort focused in one of your secondary areas of specialization. In that case, you will have the option of workshopping a different paper from the one you originally specified in your application.

Inquiries may also be sent to this email address. Please do not send inquiries to the
individual email accounts of any of the directors.

• Eligibility: Any woman entering or holding a faculty position in Philosophy at a college or university. We would especially like to encourage applications from members of groups underrepresented in Philosophy.

• Cost: There is no charge for participation in the workshop, but we expect mentees’ home institutions to cover the cost of their transportation, and room and board. Details about local arrangements and costs will be available soon.

• Accessibility: The Mentoring Project is committed to making the Workshop completely accessible to all philosophers. All meeting, dining, and guest rooms are wheelchair accessible. Philosophers needing ASL interpreters, assistive technology, or any other accommodation are asked to communicate their needs as soon as possible to Matt Haber (matt.haber@utah.edu) who is handling local arrangements.

The Mentoring Project Workshop is a project of the Women in Philosophy Task Force. It is funded this year by a grant from the Marc Sanders Foundation, and by the Department of Philosophy at the University of Utah, the University of Utah College of Humanities, the University of Utah Office of Equity and Diversity and the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Philosophy and the College of Humanities and Fine Arts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and the College of Arts and Sciences at Boston University. The Program has been supported in the past by seed grants from the American Philosophical Association.

Feminism, Philosophy, and Engaging the Public

CALL FOR PAPERS (AND ABSTRACTS)

Feminism, Philosophy, and Engaging the Public:

Theory, Policy, and Practice

October 27-29, 2017

Western University, London, Ontario

The conference will feature a workshop from feminist philosophers involved in policy. We welcome submissions about the variety of ways that feminist philosophers engage the public whether that’s through blogging and social media, taking part in policy decisions, philosophy cafes, or through activism.

Our keynote speaker will be Professor Françoise Baylis, Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy, Dalhousie University. Baylis is a philosopher who does innovative work in bioethics at the intersection of policy and practice. Her extensive publication record spans many topics, including research involving children, the role of bioethics consultants, women’s health, human embryo research, and novel genetic technologies. As a frequent guest on CBC and Radio Canada, and the author of many news stories about ethical issues, Baylis regularly engages the public on a wide range of issues. She also contributes to national policy-making via government research contracts, membership on national committees, and public education. This work – all of which is informed by a strong commitment to the common good – focuses largely on issues of social justice.

The Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy invites papers and panel proposals on the conference theme from all areas of philosophy and all philosophical approaches, including and not limited to analytic, continental, and historically oriented philosophy.

Submissions of long abstracts (1000 words) are invited for eventual presentation of papers not exceeding 3000 words. Deadline: 12am EST, February 1, 2017.

  1. Please email the abstract as a double-spaced document in Word, prepared for fully anonymous review.
  2. In your email, please provide your contact information and brief biographical material (for our SSHRC application), including: your institutional affiliation and degrees (starting with the most recent and specifying the discipline); recent positions and publications, especially those relevant to the event.
  3. We encourage all graduate students to submit their papers for consideration for the 2017 Jean Harvey Student Award. To do so, please indicate in the body of your email that you would like for the paper to be considered. In that case, the completed paper, not exceeding 3000 words and prepared for anonymous review, must be submitted by 12am EST, Monday July 11, 2017.

Panel proposal submissions: Please submit two separate documents. 1) A panel proposal, including paper abstracts, for anonymous review. 2) A document with all panelist names and biographical information for the SSHRC application.

This conference will prioritize accessibility. Guidelines for accessible presentations will be distributed with successful participant notifications. Conference rooms and the reception space are wheelchair accessible, and information about wheelchair accessible transportation and accommodations will be available by the time of participant notifications. Participants will be asked to use microphones for all talks and for discussion periods. Food will be vegan/vegetarian, and there will be space on the registration form to note food allergies and sensitivities. Participants are asked not to bring or wear strong scents. A quiet room will be available.

Further information, such as information about childcare, breastfeeding and change room areas, and transportation to and from London will be available soon at http://www.cswip.ca and also upon request.

All conference participants will be asked to identify any presentation technologies and/or other supports required to participate, and anything else that can help mitigate potential barriers to participation. All information will be kept confidential.

Please send all submissions to the following address: cswipsubmissions2017@gmail.com

Questions? Please email Samantha Brennan, sbrennan@uwo.ca

CFP: The Profession We Want: Practical Efforts to Improve Philosophy

Call for Papers: The Profession We Want: Practical Ways to Improve Philosophy

A conference organised by the Society for Women in Philosophy UK and the British Philosophical Association

Monday 15th and Tuesday 16th May

Arthur Lewis Building, Bridgeford Street, Manchester, M13 9PL.

The discipline of philosophy has for a long time been a needlessly difficult environment for women and the members of other marginalised and/or minoritised groups (including, but not limited to, groups marginalised/minoritised on the basis of race, class, disability status, and sexual orientation). Some progress has been made, especially over the last few years, in understanding and responding to the causes and consequences of this fact. In the UK, this includes the success of the BPA-SWIP Good Practice Scheme, the expansion of Athena Swan scheme to philosophy and other humanistic disciplines in the UK, and the forthcoming introduction of the Race Equality Charter. Other encouraging signs include initiatives made by some departments, student groups, journals, and learned societies. In this context of understanding and change, SWIP is seeking to lay further foundations for progress by identifying effective ways to practically respond to these problems at a departmental, national and disciplinary level. This crucially involves identifying effective strategies, implementing urgent actions, and allocating specific tasks to organizations, groups or individuals who are in a position to monitor and develop them. This conference is devoted to these aims. As well as offering theoretical resources, we are interested in talks and sessions with a more practical character. Accordingly, the second afternoon of the conference will be devoted to a two-part collaborative planning session. The first half of this session will aim to identify actions of immediate priority and strategies for implementing these, and the second half will aim to establish which organizations, groups or individuals are best able to take these on and how they can be supported to carry them out.

Keynote Speaker: Sherri Irvin (University of Oklahoma)

 

Submissions

Submission Deadline: Wednesday the 1st of February

We invite submissions that address one or both of the following aims:

  • To promote the improvement of the profession, for example by assessing strategies and techniques; identifying, pooling and disseminating resources; and fostering the development of relevant skills.
  • To provide practical support for those who have been or who may be negatively impacted by the problems affecting the profession, including mentoring, advising, and skill-sharing.

Submissions could take a variety of forms. We welcome each of the following:

  • Traditional philosophical papers on relevant topics. These might include implicit bias, stereotype threat, syllabus diversification, alternative histories, structural injustice, and norms of philosophical practice. We welcome papers with an empirical component, papers that take an intersectional approach, and papers that focus on the specific issues raised by a particular axis of marginalisation/minoritisation. Papers should be suitable for presentation in 20 minutes.
  • Symposia and roundtable discussions. These could feature any number of participants. They should be no longer than an hour and a half.
  • Practical workshops and participatory sessions. These could take a variety of forms, and could be directed towards either or both of the workshop aims. Examples of the sorts of proposals we welcome include sessions aimed at skills building and sharing, sessions aimed at collaborative assessment of proposals for action, sessions aimed at disseminating information about resources and organizations, problem based sessions, and facilitated discussions. They should be no longer and an hour and a half.

Submissions for individual papers should take the form of an abstract and should be no more than 750 words long. Submissions for symposia, roundtables, practical workshops, and participatory sessions should be no more than 1000 words, and should explain the aims and content of the session and the desired length of the session (up to a maximum of an hour and a half).

We welcome submissions for individuals, groups, and organizations. Individual and group submissions should be suitable for anonymous review; submissions from organizations can be anonymised or not at the preference of the organization and based on practicality.

Submissions should be emailed to tpww2017@gmail.com by Wednesday the 1st of February. We aim to complete the review process by the end of February. (Note: Please use this email address for submissions only; for other enquiries, please contact the organisers directly.)

 

Accessibility

  • Full accessibility information about the venue (Arthur Lewis Building) is available from the DisabledGo website. All of the conference rooms and the quiet room are fully wheelchair-accessible, and there is disabled parking about 50m from the building entrance (Also wheelchair accessible).
  • Please let us know when you register if you require a hearing loop so that we can ensure that we have enough to cover the break-out sessions.
  • The nearest hotel is the Ibis Hotel on Princess Street, which has rooms suitable for those with limited mobility; please call or email the hotel to discuss your requirements with them. It is about 1200m away from the ALB; however the 147 bus is wheelchair-accessible and stops about 20m from the hotel, and maybe 100m from the ALB. If this is unsuitable, you can book a wheelchair-accessible taxi from the hotel reception desk.
  • All mantax taxis are wheelchair accessible. They are the largest taxi company in Manchester so you’re pretty likely to be able to pick one up from the taxi rank at Piccadilly or Oxford Road station; you can also book one by phone or online. The 147 bus also goes from Piccadilly (across the street, under the railway bridge) to the hotel (and from there to the University).
  • There will be a dedicated quiet room available throughout the event.
  • Attendees with any specific access needs are invited to contact the organisers directly with any queries. If you have needs that have cost implications (e.g. BSL interpreter), please get in touch; we may be able to fund this.

The registration fee will be kept as low as possible (current projection: £30 Non-SWIP members, £25 SWIP members and supporters, £10 student/unemployed/under-employed [note: this will be a self-designating category]). The organisers are committed to ensuring that financial considerations do not present a barrier to participation. Where necessary, we will work with participants to try to secure funding to cover travel and accommodation.

For more information, see our web page.

Organisers

Helen Beebee (University of Manchester)

Katharine Jenkins (University of Nottingham)

Ian James Kidd (University of Nottingham)

Jennifer Saul (University of Sheffield)