Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

CFP: Essays on Technology March 29, 2015

Filed under: CFP,gender,glbt,technology — noetika @ 5:05 am

Contrivers’ Review Call for Essays on Technology

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Donna Haraway’s “A Manifesto for Cyborgs,” an essay that blurred the boundaries between the organic human being and the human being as a machine, a set of social practices, and cultural modes of communication and representation. Since then the postmodern turn represented in texts like Haraway’s “Manifesto” has been itself superceded. We see a resurgence of Enlightenment thought–and all the baggage it brings–in initiatives like the re:enlightenment project and The History Manifesto. However, we undoubtedly live in a world inundated with technology so that Haraway’s claim that “We are all chimera” remains accurate even if the ground of technology, politics, and gender have dramatically shifted since 1985.

As part of our long term investigation of technology and the humanities, politics, and arts, Contrivers’ Review invites submissions on any subject relating to gendered and LGBT cultures and their intersection with technology broadly defined. Some issues that might be covered include:

Social media, violence, and harassment
Gender, Feminism, and gaming culture
Discrimination in the Tech Industry/Silicon Valley/Gamer Culture
Feminist and Queer history/historiography of new media
Creating/Creative Communities
Technologies of bodies
Gender, professionalism, and online identities
Feminist Digital Humanities

Contrivers’ Review is an intellectual journal not a scholarly, refereed publication. As such, we publish essays and reviews that bridge academic audiences and the wider public. Submissions and pitch letters should be addressed to a broad audience, not fellow specialists in the academy. Essays should be between 1,500 and 3,000 words. Please send us a query letter at editors@contrivers.org. For more information, please refer to our masthead.

 

CFP: Pleasure and Danger: Sexual Freedom and Feminism in the Twenty-First Century March 12, 2015

Filed under: CFP — noetika @ 2:11 am

Call for Papers: Pleasure and Danger: Sexual Freedom and Feminism in the Twenty-First Century

Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society invites submissions for a special issue titled “Pleasure and Danger:  Sexual Freedom and Feminism in the Twenty-First Century,” slated for publication in the Autumn 2016 issue. The deadline for submissions is April 1, 2015.

At the heart of the feminist project is a persistent concern with thinking through the “powers of desire” (Snitow, Stansell, and Thompson 1983) and expanding the potential for sexual and gender freedom and self-determination at the same time that we combat sadly persistent forms of sexual danger and violence.  Exemplified in the US context by Carole Vance’s landmark collection, Pleasure and Danger: Exploring Female Sexuality, feminist debates over sex, gender, and society have been incendiary.  First published in 1984, as proceedings of the infamous “Scholar and the Feminist” conference at Barnard, which initiated the equally infamous “sex wars,” this volume reproduced intense dialogue while also contributing to a much broader investigation of the politics (and pleasures, and dangers) of sexuality within feminist theory and culture. Articles that threw down gauntlets were subsequently canonized and celebrated.  Much has changed since that explosive conference and book. Even the subtitle – “exploring female sexuality” – would now be more deeply interrogated (biologically female? presumptively heterosexual?) and certainly pluralized.  But however reframed, the paradoxical joining that is “pleasure and danger” remains poignantly relevant.

For this special issue, we invite transdisciplinary and transnational submissions that address questions and debates provoked by the “pleasure and danger” couplet.  Submissions may engage with the historical (how different is our moment from that formative “sex wars” era? have the sex wars moved to new terrain such as trafficking and slut-shaming?); the representational (how does the digital era transform our sexual lives? what does “livestreaming” sexual assault do to/for feminist organizing? what possibilities are there for feminist and queer imagery in an era of prolific porn, commodified otherness, and everyday inclusion?); the structural (how do race, ethnicity, religion, and national cultures enable and constrain sexual freedoms? how do carceral and governance feminisms frame and perhaps contain earlier liberatory impulses?); and/or the intersectional (how do we analyze the mutually constituting relations of sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, class, nationality, ability, age, and so on?). There are local and global questions to be asked and strategic arguments to be resolved.  And the very terms are themselves constantly debated (whose pleasure are we speaking of and for?  who is the “we” doing that speaking? who is imagined to be “in danger?” how does “gender” signify differently in that couplet from “sexuality?”).

We particularly encourage analyses from all regions of the globe that address pressing concerns and that do so in a way that is accessible and, well, passionate!  We encourage bold and big thinking that seeks to reckon with the conundrum still signaled by the pleasure/danger frame.  We especially seek submissions that attend to the couplet itself, to the centrality of pleasure/danger within the project of making feminism matter and resonate in ways both intimate and structural, deeply sensual and liberatory, simultaneously championing multiplicities of pleasures and a lasting freedom from violence and abuse.

Manuscripts may be submitted electronically through Signs Editorial Manager system at http://signs.edmgr.com.  Please choose the article type “Pleasure and Danger – Special Issue Article.” Guidelines for submission are available here. This Call for Papers is also available as a PDF. Please email the journal office with any questions.

 

CFA: Nonhuman Animals, Birmingham February 18, 2015

Filed under: CFP — jennysaul @ 6:23 am

CONFERENCE and FINAL Call for Abstracts (extended deadline)

This is an updated reminder for he call for abstracts and registration for the two-day international conference – ‘Ethics and/or Politics: Approaching the Issues Concerning Nonhuman Animals’ – to be held at the University of Birmingham on the 9th and 10th of April, 2015.

The conference is in association with, and supported by: the Society for Applied Philosophy, the Mind Association, the Aristotelian Society, Minding Animals International, and the University of Birmingham College of Arts and Law.

Guest speakers include:

*   Gary Steiner                 (Bucknell University)
*   Elisa Aaltola                  (University of Turku/University of Eastern Finland)
*   Robert Garner              (University of Leicester)
*   Tony Milligan                (University of Hertfordshire)
*   Alasdair Cochrane         (University of Sheffield)
*   Tatjana Visak               (Saarland University)
*   Oscar Horta                 (University of Santiago de Compostela)
*   Steve Cooke                (University of Sheffield)
*   Kay Peggs                   (University of Portsmouth)

(more…)

 

Political Theory at the Margins — CFP January 27, 2015

Filed under: CFP — Lady Day @ 7:56 pm

We’ve just heard from the organizers of a what sounds like a great upcoming Oxford University graduate conference  with the theme ‘Political Theory at the Margins’.

They write:

The conference aims to explore issues of marginalisation in political philosophy, including those based on gender and race. Our keynote speakers Humeira Iqtidar (King’s College London) and Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman (University College London), have been active in trying to broaden what is considered political philosophy and should make for an interesting discussion.

Check out the CFP here.

Deadline for submissions is 6th March with a 500 word abstract.

 

CFP: SWIP-I and UCC Aesthetics and the Feminine Conference January 22, 2015

Filed under: CFP — Stacey Goguen @ 3:54 pm

University College Cork, Ireland, Friday 17th – Saturday 18th July 2015

“[A]gainst the dispersed, contingent and multiple existences of actual women, mythical thought opposes the Eternal Feminine, unique and changeless. If the definition provided for this concept is contradicted by the behaviour of flesh and blood women, it is the latter who are wrong: we are told Femininity is not a false entity, but that the women concerned are not feminine.” (Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex)

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Stacie Friend (Birkbeck College)
Áine Mahon (University College Dublin)
E. L. Putnam (Performance Artist, Dublin)

Conference Organisers:
Mary Edwards (University College Cork)
Áine Mahon (University College Dublin)

Design by Emily Putnam

The ‘Aesthetics and the Feminine’ Summer conference is supported by The Society for Women In Philosophy Ireland (SWIP-I) and the Philosophy Department at University College Cork and aims to provide a supportive, engaging environment for all researchers working on the topic of the feminine in aesthetics, or the thought/work of female aestheticians/artists.

The ‘Aesthetics and the Feminine’ Summer conference is supported by The Society for Women In Philosophy Ireland (SWIP-I) and the Philosophy Department at University College Cork and aims to provide a supportive, engaging environment for all researchers working on the topic of the feminine in aesthetics, or the thought/work of female aestheticians/artists.

Possible topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

· Studies on the work of female artist(s)
· Relevant topics in aesthetics generally and especially the work of female aesthetician(s)
· Representations of women in the visual arts
· Critical analyses of “feminine” characters in literature/film
· Analysis/Application of feminist criticism
· Analysis/Application of feminist psychoanalytic criticism
· The role of art in the creation and perpetuation of Myth of Woman
· “Feminine” beauty
· “Feminine” art
· Androgyny in art/literature/film
· Representations of female sexuality in art/literature/film
· Interpretations of the “feminine” in art as empowering/degrading
· Feminist art/literature/film
· “Masculine” or un-“feminine” females in art/literature/film
· Tragic heroines
· “Feminine” Vs “Masculine” Art
· Écriture féminine
· The femme fatale
· “Chick-flicks” and “chick-lit”: art for females?

Submissions: Abstracts of 200 words  for 20-minute presentations  (a l lo w i n g f o r 1 0 minutes Q&A after ward), in Word document  format should be prepared  for blind review (together with a separate cover sheet detailing institutional information etc.) and emailed to: marylouise.eds@gmail.com.

We welcome proposals from a broad range of disciplines including philosophy, comparative literature, art history, gender studies, cultural studies, the social sciences and other relevant disciplines. Interdisciplinary studies are encouraged as well as proposals for co-presentations and panels. We also invite artists, working on relevant  themes/subjects, to discuss and present their work at this event.

The deadline for submissions is Monday 20th April 2015 and we aim to respond to applicants with the results of our selection processes in early May 2015. Please send any queries to: marylouise.eds@gmail.com.

 

CFP: 2015 Bellingham Summer Philosophy Conference January 10, 2015

Filed under: CFP — noetika @ 7:54 am

The CFP:

The 16th annual Bellingham Summer Philosophy Conference will take place from August 2nd to August 6th, 2015, in Bellingham, Washington. Everyone in the world is invited to submit a paper, or to volunteer to be a commentator or session chair, but conference attendance is limited to those on the conference program (and also to members of the conference program committee, the assistant conference organizers, and members of the WWU philosophy department). This is partly due to funding and logistical constraints, and partly due to the fact that the BSPC is a workshop-style conference that involves in-depth discussions of works-in-progress.

To submit a paper:

Submissions must be in PDF format, and they must be prepared for blind review. They should be emailed to the BSPC 2015 Program Committee at bspc2015@gmail.com. Please include an abstract and a word count, including footnotes and bibliography, on the first page of the paper.

Papers on any topic are welcome, but the conference program committee will be looking for papers that are of interest to all BSPC participants, regardless of AOS.

Papers of any length will be considered, but shorter papers (under about 8,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography) will have a better chance of being accepted than longer papers.

The BSPC is a workshop-style conference, and the papers on the program will be read in advance by all conference participants. So please submit a paper only if you are certain that, if your paper is on the program, you will have a chance to incorporate feedback from the BSPC in any subsequent, for-publication version of your paper.

The deadline for submissions is March 1st, 2015 (at midnight Pacific Time at the end of the day). Authors will be notified of the Program Committee’s decisions by mid-May.

To volunteer to be a commentator or chair:

All volunteers should e-mail the 2015 BSPC Program Committee at bspc2015@gmail.com. Prospective commentators should indicate their areas of specialization. The deadline for volunteering is March 1st, 2015 (at midnight Pacific Time at the end of the day). Volunteers will be notified of the Program Committee’s decisions by mid-May.

Please note: The BSPC is a workshop-style conference whose participants are expected to read all of the papers in advance, to attend all of the sessions, and to come prepared for discussion. You should not submit a paper, or volunteer to comment or chair, unless you plan on reading all of the papers in advance and attending all of the sessions.

More on the conference here. 

 

CFP: Society for Philosophy and Psychology January 8, 2015

Filed under: CFP — jennysaul @ 8:55 pm

Deadline January 15!!

Duke University June 4-6

Keynotes

Mahzarin Banaji, with reply from Keith Payne Frances Egan, with reply from Karen Neander Dan Sperber, with reply from Kurt Gray

Symposia

“Imagination,” with Melanie Green, Neil van Leeuwen, and Marjorie Taylor

“Cognitive Ontologies,” with Michael Anderson, Scott Huettel, and Colin Klein

“Implicit Attitudes,” with Bertram Gawronski, Kerry Kawakami, and Jennifer Nagel

Presentation types:
–Long-form presentation: 30 minutes plus Q&A –Short-form presentations: 15-20 minutes plus Q&A –Posters

Philosophical or psychological research may be submitted for any of the above formats. For short and long-form presentations, author(s) may choose to submit either an abstract no longer than 1500 words or a paper no longer than 3000 words. For posters, authors should submit an abstract no longer than 750 words. Work that is not accepted for the author(s)’ preferred format may be considered for a short-form presentation or poster.

Papers and abstracts must be written in a format appropriate for anonymous review and employ gender-neutral language. Individual authors may submit only one paper or abstract as first author, though they may be co-authors on other submissions. Childcare will be available.

Submit here.

 

 

CFP: Global Gender Justice: New Directions December 22, 2014

Filed under: CFP — philodaria @ 1:49 am

The Centre for the Study of Global Ethics at the University of Birmingham is pleased to announce ‘Global Gender Justice: New Directions’, a conference to be hosted on 21 and 22 May 2015.

Confirmed speakers include:

Alison Jaggar (Colorado, Birmingham)
Nicola Jones (Overseas Development Institute)
Sue Lloyd Roberts (BBC)
Theresa Tobin (Marquette)
Heather Widdows (Birmingham)

Further speakers will be confirmed next year.

As a part of this conference, we welcome papers for two panel presentations, one for postgraduate students and one for early career researchers (defined as within 6 years of receiving the PhD).  Accommodation and transportation will be guaranteed for invited speakers from the UK.  Every effort will be made to cover transportation costs for invited international speakers.

Possible topics include:
-gendered aspects of traditional topics in global justice including income inequality, climate change, the resource curse, international trade, international migration, war and conflict, labour exploitation, global food systems, financial crises, etc.
-gender-specific issues that arise in the context of globalization, including commercial surrogacy, international sex work, transnational causes of violence against women, international law and gender specific crimes against humanity,
-the way in which globalization and theories of global justice have shaped or changed standard conceptions of feminist issues, including the public-private divide, the politics of representation, reproductive justice, care work, intersectionality,

We welcome papers from a range of fields but especially encourage submissions that develop normative analysis of issues in global gender justice.  Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, prepared for blind review, to s.l.wisor@bham.ac.uk.   Please submit a separate cover sheet with author name, title, institution, location from which you would be travelling, and whether you have access to travel support funds.  Abstracts are due 31 January 2015.

 

CFP: Taming Power in Times of Globalization: What Role for Human Rights?

Filed under: CFP — philodaria @ 1:45 am

Call for Papers
Conference-workshop
Taming Power in Times of Globalization:
What Role for Human Rights?

Monday, 30 November 2015, and Tuesday, 01 December 2015.
Irish Centre for Human Rights
National University of Ireland Galway

The ways power is exercised today at the global level seems to be qualitatively different, demanding new responses from international law and other relevant disciplines. In particular, it seems that today the exercise of power at the global level is less controllable, less subject to restraints and checks than some decades ago. Global governance, international or global constitutionalism, legal pluralism are terms indicating some of the ways developed in the scholarship to comprehend, analyse and respond to challenges posed by the contemporary forms of exercise of power at the global level.
Human rights are featured prominently in the Western thought as hallmarks of protection of individuals against the arbitrary exercise of power.
Human rights form today a core of any Western constitutional order. However, the role of international human rights as mechanisms for controlling exercise of power at the global level is articulated only rudimentarily. The conference aims at providing a forum for discussion about the place of human rights in current discourses on globalization. Instead of assuming that human rights are a proof of the possibility to control power at the global level, the conference aims at examining this premise from a variety of perspectives.
The following are some of the questions the organizers would like to see addressed.
•       What human rights are part of international constitutional order?
•       How legal pluralism/global governance/various theories of constitutionalism conceive the role of human rights as a mechanism for limiting exercise of power at the global level?
•       What are the consequences of different answers?
•       How precisely human rights as guarantees against arbitrary exercise of power function within different visions?
•       Are there any alternatives available to the human rights language?
•       Can other mechanism of control over arbitrary exercise of power at the international/global level be imagined?

Contributions can address these and other related issues from a variety of perspectives, both theoretical and empirical. Critical and interdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.  Contributions examining relavant issues from a historical perspective, or integrating experience of non western legal traditions are also welcome.
Contributions will be selected following a peer-review process. The selection will be based on the following criteria: relevance to the conference theme, originality, overall coherence of selected papers with a view of producing engaging discussion. The organizers have publication plans for the presented papers. The precise format of publication will be discussed during the conference. Therefore, all selected contributions must be original and not published elsewhere. All presenters will be required to submit full papers in advance.
Accommodation for presenters will be provided. There are limited funds available to cover travel expenses. Please indicate while applying whether you would like to be considered for reimbursement of travel expenses and indicate if possible the approximate amount.

Submission guidelines:
Abstracts should be no more than 500 words long; contain the name, institutional affiliation and contact details of the author; indicate a title of the presentation, questions to be addressed, methodology and overall approach. Abstracts should be sent by 15 March 2015 in Word format to Ekaterina Yahyaoui ekaterina.yahyaoui@nuigalway.ie and Zoi Aliozi zoi.aliozi@nuigalway.ie
For inqueries, please contact Dr Zoi Aliozi at zoi.aliozi@nuigalway.ie
Important dates:
Abstract submission: 15 March 2015
Communication of decisions: 10 April 2015
Submission of draft papers: 1 November 2015

 

cfp: Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology 2015 December 12, 2014

Filed under: CFP — axiothea @ 6:26 am

Announcing the 5th Annual

Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology Conference

At the Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology
The University of Texas at Dallas
May 19-22, 2015

Keynote Speaker:

Science, technology, and medicine have a major impact on our lives. We live with constant technological innovation and scientific discovery, and this changes the conditions that we live in, as well as the way we understand ourselves and the world around us. Science, technology, and medicine are thus entangled with our values, our culture, and our politics, and they have an important impact on policymaking and action. Making value judgments is important to the way that we fund, conduct, evaluate, and apply scientific research.

We invite proposals for papers that engage with these issues from a variety of disciplinary and theoretical approaches, including philosophy of science, technology, & medicine, epistemology, ethics and political philosophy, history, science and technology studies, policy studies, and natural and social sciences.

See here for the full description and abstract submission.

 

 
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