Reflections on trying to organise a panel with more women

Recently, we—Elisa Freschi and Malcolm Keating—set about organizing a panel for the upcoming ATINER panel. We aimed for a panel which would include significant numbers of women, using suggestions from the Gendered Conference Campaign (GCC) published on the Feminist Philosophers website to achieve this goal. Not only is the result an exciting combination of global philosophical interests which can push back against stereotypes of philosophy as a Western activity, its gender ratio can push back against stereotypes of philosophy as a male activity. Our hope is that the more panels and conferences which work to include women, the more women’s names will come to mind as experts in these topics. Further, hopefully younger generations of women will find it easier to find a path in academic philosophy. And finally, including more women who might otherwise be ignored due to implicit bias means better philosophy will be done.

Click here to read their reflections.

2014 and our profession

There is, obviously, a lot that still needs to be done to make our profession the place we’d like it to be. And I find it’s far too easy to let negative stuff dominate my consciousness.  So over the last few days I’ve been asking people to send me lists of good things that have happened in our profession in the last year. Here’s a start. Please add more in comments!

Fantastic new directory of philosophers from underrepresented groups!

Ruth Chang writes:

It is fully searchable and really neat. If you’re a conference organizer looking for philosophers in your city who work on X, you can search the directory and come up with a list of such philosophers from underrepresented groups that fit the bill. If you’re on a hiring committee, and the usual suspects keep coming to mind but you’d like to do a more thorough search, you can pull up the directory and find all philosophers in the directory who work in a general AOS or even on a specific research topic. If you’re an editor looking for a list of possible candidates to invite to contribute to a volume or to referee a paper, the UPDirectory can help you.

This sounds like a really wonderful tool. Go check it out!

Men Publish on the Foundations of Logical Consequence

A new edited volume from OUP with thirteen papers and zero female authors.

From the description:

This volume presents thirteen essays by some of the most important scholars in the field of philosophical logic. The essays offer ground-breaking new insights into the nature of logical consequence; the relation between logic and inference; how the semantics and pragmatics of natural language bear on logic; the relativity of logic; and the structural properties of the consequence relation.

Humane philosophy by men

This week sees the launch of the Humane Philosophy Project/Ian Ramsey Centre
2014-15 seminar. Details below. More information can be found at
http://www.humanephilosophy.com or http://www.ianramseycentre.info/

The following seminars will be given on Thursdays at 8:30pm, preceded by
refreshments at 8:15pm, in the Aula of Blackfriars Hall, St Giles, Oxford.
Seminars are free and open to the public. Conveners: Dr Andrew Pinsent;
Mikolaj Sławkowski-Rode and Ralph Weir.

Alister McGrath, Professor of Science and Religion, University of Oxford,
23 Oct: ‘“Tis all in pieces, all coherence gone” (John Donne): The search
for coherence in science and religion’

Daniel Came, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Hull
6 Nov: ‘Nietzsche on art and philosophy’

Anthony Kenny, Former Master of Balliol, President of the British Academy
and the Royal Institute of Philosophy
20 Nov: ‘Humanism vs anthropomorphism’

Alexander Stoddart, Her Majesty’s Sculptor in Ordinary in Scotland
4 Dec: ‘The molten calf and the contemporary art world’

A philosophy conference so diverse it merited a news story

The Diverse Lineages of Existentialism meeting was a far cry from a typical philosophy conference. In a discipline dominated by white men, this conference hosted as many women as men and a large number of people of color along with white participants. In a discipline often characterized by its esoteric isolation from public and politics, instead there was outpouring of conversations about social justice and lived human experience. Given the recent public and professional conversations about the lack of diversity in philosophy, the Diverse Lineages of Existentialism (DLE) conference is a hopeful glance into the future of the discipline – one that is long overdue and necessary if philosophy is to continue as a viable and relevant living and growing field, both in the academy and in the public imagination.

More here.