CFP: Conference on Faculty and Staff Sexual Misconduct

International conference on faculty and staff sexual misconduct

June 30 to July 2, 2019, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA

Increasing attention being paid across the world to sexual and gender harassment and sexual violence occurring between students within universities. However, there remains a dearth of research and expertise globally on sexual misconduct carried out by faculty and staff in universities. This conference will bring together cross-disciplinary voices engaged in advocacy, research, and organisational change around power-based academic sexual misconduct in order to build a common understanding of the nature of the problem and to generate ways forward that are effective across international policy and legal frameworks. The conference will provide an international forum to discuss this issue, opening up a space for sharing resources, discussing barriers to change, and identifying successful practices. The event is being put on by a group of scholar-activists from the US and UK in receipt of a grant from the National Science Foundation (HRD-1836685). Information about the organising committee can be found here.

The primary purpose of this conference is therefore to share knowledge and build links between advocates, academics, survivors, experts, and other change-makers from different countries and contexts working on this topic. We would therefore particularly like to receive applications from attendees from outside the US and UK.

We will be aiming to have good representation of groups at the conference including non-US based activists/academics; attendees from countries from the Global South; current students; people of colour; people from disability communities; gender non-conforming attendees.

This conference is intended to be a safer and inclusive space. We are particularly keen to receive abstracts from advocates and academics from marginalised positions, whether due to disability, race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexuality, class background, or other multi-marginalised identities, and the conference will have a NO TOLERANCE policy for language, discrimination, or harassment/bullying based on sexism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, audism, and ableism. We welcome applications from survivors of staff/faculty sexual misconduct, as well as other forms of sexual violence. We also welcome suggestions for how to make the space as inclusive as possible for survivors and other marginalised groups. We would also like to receive applications for attendees who would like to participate remotely.

Financial support is available for some attendees, and those who would be unable to attend without this support will be prioritised. You can request financial support on the application form. Please do not rule yourself out if lack of money is a barrier to attending. Alternatively, you can apply to present or participate remotely. For the conference, we will be adopting the guidelines from this Accessible Conference Guide: http://www.sigaccess.org/welcome-to-sigaccess/resources/accessible-conference-guide/

Application submission deadline: Please fill out this online form by Sunday 6 January 2019, midnight British Standard Time/8pm UTC

For further information see https://facultysexualmisconduct.com/call-for-proposals/ or tweet @FassmC or email FacultySexualMisconduct@gmail.com

Endorse a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Early Modern Women Philosophers

Jacqueline Broad, Marilyn Stendera, Patrick Spedding, and Mia Goodwin are planning a Wikipedia edit-a-thon to increase the visibility of early modern women philosophers and women writers (c. 1600-1800) —and they need our support.

They are preparing an application to the Wikimedia Foundation for a Project Grant, which is due on 30 November. The purpose of the grant is to invite academic experts from around the world to update and/or create Wikipedia entries about early modern women philosophers/writers.

Jacqueline Broad sent me the following request which I am passing on to all of you along with the instructions for endorsing the project.

One of the criteria that Wikimedia uses in assessing proposals is the number of public endorsements a project receives on the official grant portal. These can be anonymous or linked to your Wikipedia account (if you have one already).

Please would you kindly consider endorsing us? It should take only a few minutes of your time. We need every endorsement we can get by the end of the month; it will make a huge difference to our application’s feasibility.

We have included instructions on how to endorse our project below, plus a link to the application itself. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Thank you in advance for your help—it’s greatly appreciated!

How to endorse our project:
1 Head to our project proposal – you can also read our full grant application there.

 

  1. Scroll down a bit until you see the bright blue ‘Endorse’ button on the right side, and click this.

 

  1. A new window will pop up. Write up a comment explaining why you want to support the project; length is up to you. Keep in mind that it will be publicly available indefinitely, so be careful with any identifying information. Anything that you can add which will add weight to your comment (expertise but also role as part of Wikipedia’s target audience) would help. E.g. “As someone who researches/has published on X…”, “I use Wikipedia all the time and would love to see more articles on X…”, “I direct my students to use Wikipedia as a first stop in their research, and it would be great if they could see more information about X…”.

 

  1. Click ‘Endorse’ to publish the comment.

 

  1. If you don’t have a Wikipedia account/are not signed in, the comment will appear linked to IP address of the computer you’re using (which is how Wikipedia tracks you anyway).

 

  1. If you have a Wikipedia account and are signed in, the comment will appear linked to your profile.

 

  1. We don’t recommend creating a Wikipedia account just for this. However, if you do, please familiarise yourself with the Wiki guidelinesfor this, especially their argument against using your real name. Feel free to ask me if you have any questions.

 

CFA: Political Theory Graduate Conference, London

LSE Political Theory Graduate Conference

The LSE Department of Government is pleased to announce its fifth Political Theory Graduate Conference to take place on 14th and 15th March 2019. The aim of the conference is to give graduate students working in the field of political theory (broadly conceived) an opportunity to present and discuss their projects with peers, receive feedback on work in progress, and build a wider community of graduate political theorists across the UK, Europe and beyond.

Papers on any theme or topic within political theory and political philosophy will be considered.

Deadline: December 31st, 2018
Please send your abstract to: lsepotygradconf@gmail.com.

Do not place any identifying information in the abstract.

In the body of the e-mail, please detail your name, institutional affiliation and whether you wish to apply for a travel bursary – we have a limited budget based on need. If you do, please include also a brief paragraph describing your funding situation.

Acceptance notifications: late January.
All abstracts will undergo a double-blind review process.

Attendance is free of charge, and lunch and coffee will be served along with a complimentary dinner.

For any further questions, please contact: Temi Ogunye – t.ogunye@lse.ac.uk
or Antoine Louette – a.louette@lse.ac.uk

Scholarships for international women students: Montreal

The Carol Lee Price Scholarships

The Scholarships are specifically intended to attract and support women pursuing graduate studies in philosophy at Concordia University, Montreal. They are restricted to students who would otherwise have to pay international fees. Each scholarship is worth $32,450 CAD; up to three may be awarded each year.

See: https://www.concordia.ca/artsci/philosophy/programs/graduate/carol-lee-price-scholarship.html

Requirements (three categories)

The Carol Lee Price MA Scholarship in Human Rights and Social Justice:

Applicants shall have obtained: (1) a BA in Philosophy with high distinction and at least 21 credits (7 courses, or the equivalent in their country of origin, in either law, political science, sociology, economics or cognate disciplines; OR (2) a university degree (BA or higher) with high distinction in law, political science, sociology, economics or cognate disciplines, and at least 21 credits (7 courses), or the equivalent in their country of origin, in philosophy. Acceptable research areas proposed by the applicant for the MA include human rights, social justice, and related questions concerning legal and other social institutions and practices.

The Carol Lee Price MA Scholarship in Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics:

Applicants shall have obtained: (1) a BA in Philosophy with high distinction and at least 21 credits (7 courses), or the equivalent in the country of origin, in Mathematics, OR (2) a BA in Mathematics with high distinction and at least 21 credits (7 courses), or the equivalent in their country of origin, in Philosophy. Acceptable research area topics for the MA are Logic, History and Philosophy of Logic, Philosophy of Mathematics.

The Carol Lee Price MA Scholarship in Ancient Philosophy:

Applicants shall have obtained: (1) a BA in Classics with high distinction and at least 21 credits (7 courses), or the equivalent in the country of origin, in Philosophy; OR (2) a BA in Philosophy with at least 21 credits (7 courses), or the equivalent in the country of origin in Classics. Since study of texts in the original languages is required, applicants are expected to know ancient Greek or Latin. Preference will be given to those who know both languages.

Application Instructions:

Applications for the Carol Lee Price Scholarships should be emailed to: philosophy.gpd@concordia.ca

In addition to the regular admissions application, which consists of providing the official transcripts of all post-secondary schools attended, three letters of reference, and a sample of writing in the range of 2,500-3,750 words (see admission requirements), the applicant shall provide a two-page statement of a research project in one of the following areas: Philosophy of Human Rights, Philosophy of Law, Social and Political Philosophy, Logic, History and Philosophy of Logic; Philosophy of Mathematics; or Greek or Roman Philosophy.

Deadline for Applications: February 1, together with the regular admissions application.

For additional information, please contact our Graduate Program Director, Department of Philosophy, Concordia University, Montreal, at philosophy.gpd@concordia.ca.

CFP: Moral and Political Philosophy at the Border

The Moral and Political Philosophy at the Border Conference aims to highlight philosophical research in moral, social, and political philosophy. We welcome work in any area of moral and political philosophy since one aim of this conference is to enrich the dialogue at the border about issues in these areas. We especially encourage work relevant to philosophical issues about the border such as immigration and human rights.

We invite submissions from undergraduate students for poster presentations and from graduate students and faculty for paper presentations. We plan to allocate a certain number of sessions for presentation in Spanish, and we will consider submissions in either English or Spanish.

Interested applicants should send an abstract of no more than 1,000 words (300 words for undergraduate poster submissions) prepared for blind review to: mpconference2019@gmail.com no later than December 15, 2018. Full papers should be suitable for a 30 minute presentation. Applicants can expect to receive notification of acceptance by the end of January.

We anticipate the ability to provide modest scholarships to student presenters who will be traveling from low GDP countries, with the aim of helping to offset travel expenses. If you qualify for such a scholarship, and you would like to apply, please indicate this in your initial email.

This event is made possible through generous support from Hypatia, the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies at UTEP, and the Humanities Program at UTEP.

“The Colonel’s’s Lady and Judy O’Grady…

The title of this post comes from a Kipling poem that ends with

The Colonel’s Lady an’ Judy O’Grady
     Are sisters under their skins!

The poem reflects the easy racism and sexism of a powerful imperial country, as Great Britain once was.  It would, however, be a mistake to think that we’ve moved beyond the deep expectation that European women form the model for women around the world.  According to very recent research reported in the NYTimes, women are not all the same under the skin; the idea that they are may be a source of some harm in, e.g., medically assistedd childdbirth.

Look up the term “pelvic canal” in the typical anatomy or obstetric textbook, and you likely will find a description such as this: “Well-built healthy women, who had a good diet during their childhood growth period, usually have a broad pelvis.”

Such a pelvis, the text continues, enables “the least difficulty during childbirth.”

But such characterizations have long been based on anatomical studies of people of European descent. In reality, the structure of the pelvic canal, the bony structure through which most of us enter the world, varies tremendously between populations, according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The findings have implications for how obstetricians treat patients of color, the authors say. In the United States, racial disparities in maternal health care are prevalent. Compounding factors like interpersonal and institutional racism, poverty, poor health care access and environmental burdens disproportionately harm black mothers. These contribute to the risk of pregnancy-related deaths being three to four times higher for black women than for white women.

George Yancy: owning responsibility

From the NY Times

… That day I learned something about me. I didn’t respect her {my new wife’s} autonomy, her legal standing and personhood. As pathetic as this may sound, I saw her as my property, to be defined by my name and according to my legal standing. While this was not sexual assault, my insistence was a violation of her independence. I had inherited a subtle, yet still violent, form of toxic masculinity. It still raises its ugly head — I should be thanked when I clean the house, cook, sacrifice my time. These are deep and troubling expectations that are shaped by male privilege, male power and toxic masculinity.

If you are a woman reading this, I have failed you. Through my silence and an uninterrogated collective misogyny, I have failed you. I have helped and continue to help perpetuate sexism. I know about how we hold onto forms of power that dehumanize you only to elevate our sense of masculinity. I recognize my silence as an act of violence. For this, I sincerely apologize.

 

CFP, #MeToo by March 31, 2019

From Lauren Freeman:

CALL FOR PAPERS

The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy

Fall 2019 Issue: #MeToo and Philosophy

 The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy invites papers on the topic of #MeToo and Philosophy. In 2006 Tarana Burke, a Black feminist social activist and community organizer, founded the Me Too movement to focus on the experiences of abuse suffered by Black and brown girls and women who are and remain disproportionately vulnerable. More specifically, the goal of Me Too was to connect survivors of sexual assault to the resources they need in order to heal. More than a decade later, this movement became #MeToo, a hashtag used in social media to demonstrate the ubiquity of sexual assault and harassment, especially in the workplace. As Tarana Burke has recently said, “What #MeToo allowed people to do was create community with these shared experiences. You have a built-in group of people who automatically gets you, who automatically believes you, who automatically wants to hear you. That’s the wildfire of it.”

This movement continues to be foisted into national and international consciousness as more and more men are accused and charged of sexually harassing and abusing women. And yet the number of cases that go unreported, the number of women who remain silent are even larger, pointing to the systemic problems of injustice for victims of abuse, assault, and harassment and the systematic failures of our institutions to bring about justice. All of these problems are complicated by the class, race, nationality, immigration status, sexuality, gender identity, and disability of victims.

#MeToo is a crucial form of resistance and the #MeToo movement, in all of its complexity, is ripe for philosophical engagement and analysis.

The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy invites papers, book reviews, and narratives for the Fall 2019 issue that include, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • #MeToo and anger
  • #MeToo and shame
  • #MeToo and forgiveness
  • #MeToo and epistemic injustice
  • #MeToo and gaslighting
  • #MeToo and credibility
  • #MeToo and testimony
  • #MeToo and allies
  • Intersectional analyses of #MeToo movement
  • #MeToo and himpathy
  • #MeToo and misogyny
  • #MeToo and misogynoir
  • #MeToo and transmisogyny
  • #MeToo and justice
  • #MeToo and domestic violence
  • #MeToo and sex education
  • #MeToo and internet bullying
  • #MeToo and civility
  • #MeToo and the silencing of victims
  • #MeToo and academia
  • #MeToo in non-western countries and contexts
  • Trauma informed responses to #MeToo
  • #MeTooAfterKavanaugh
  • #WhyIDidn’tReport
  • The backlash of #HimToo

Invited papers by the following philosophers will appear in the issue:

  • Cassie Herbert (Illinois State University)
  • Alice MacLachlan (York University)
  • Lori Watson (University of San Diego)
  • Robin Zheng (Yale NUS-College)

SUBMISSION DETAILS

The APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy welcomes three different types of submissions:

  1.  Papers: philosophical papers should be no longer than 7000 words (including references and footnotes).
  2.  Book reviews: The newsletter will publish reviews of books with feminist content. The length should be between 1500-2500 words. Review books need not be related to the topic of the special issue. Reviewers must have specific expertise on the subject of the text. The format of book reviews is as follows. They should begin with a brief description of the book as a whole, should contextualize the book within the relevant literature, and should develop a critical evaluation of at least some of the main themes and arguments. Evaluative comments should be specific, instructive, and respectful of diverse philosophical methods and voices.

If you are interested in reviewing a book for the Newsletter, please send a C.V. and a brief explanation of your particular interest in and qualifications for reviewing the chosen text to the following address: Lauren.Freeman [at] Louisville.edu. If you do not own the book, I will request a copy from the publisher. Deadlines for reviews are negotiable.

  1. Narrative essays: We also invite shorter narrative style essays of around 2500 words in length. These essays should be less formal than standard philosophical papers and can discuss issues and problems related to feminism that philosophers face within the academy, but also in our public and personal lives.

The format for all submissions to the Newsletter is available on the APA website: http://www.apaonline.org/?feminism_newsletter

Submissions should be prepared for anonymous review and must be submitted by March 31, 2019.

Send submissions to: Lauren.Freeman [at] Louisville.edu

Lauren Freeman

Editor, APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy

University of Louisville, Department of Philosophy

 

 

Grete Hermann: neglected philosopher of physics

Do check out this short video!

In the early 20th century, Newtonian physics was upended by experiments that revealed a bizarre subatomic universe riddled with peculiarities and inconsistencies. Why do photons and electrons behave as both particles and waves? Why should the act of observation affect the behaviour of physical systems? More than just a puzzle for scientists to sort out, this quantum strangeness had unsettling implications for our understanding of reality, including the very concept of truth.

The German mathematician and philosopher Grete Hermann offered some intriguing and original answers to these puzzles. In a quantum universe, she argued, the notion of absolute truth must be abandoned in favour of a fragmented view – one in which the way we measure the world affects the slice of it that we can see. She referred to this idea as the ‘splitting of truth’, and believed it extended far beyond the laboratory walls and into everyday life. With a striking visual style inspired by the modern art of Hermann’s era, this Aeon Original video explores one of Hermann’s profound but undervalued contributions to quantum theory – as well as her own split life as an anti-Nazi activist, social justice reformer and educator.