Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Spanking is harmful, 5 decades of research shows April 30, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 7:28 pm

Meta-analyses by researchers at UT Austin and U of Michigan indicate that spanking produces the opposite of what parents want:  Defiant instead of compliant children.  And the ills of spanking can last well beyond childhood.

 

Female sports reporters receive abusive comments

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 6:52 pm

Men who are not the original authors read (or try to read) some of the tweets.  The NYT provides some of the background.

.

 

Anthropology tackles sexual harassment

So much is so familiar.  But there are some good ideas we haven’t tried.  In particular:

Meeting registrants were required to agree to AAPA’s code of ethics, which forbids sexual harassment and discrimination, and many attendees sported ribbons with antidiscrimination slogans.

Really interestingly, their problems seem just like ours, despite very different numbers.  8 out of 10 of their board members are women, and the association’s members are 56% women.

 

For more, go here.

 

 

Oklahoma: Not rape if victim is unconscious

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 6:37 am

An Oklahoma court has stunned local prosecutors with a declaration that state law doesn’t criminalize oral sex with a victim who is completely unconscious.

The ruling, a unanimous decision by the state’s criminal appeals court, is sparking outrage among critics who say the judicial system was engaged in victim-blaming and buying outdated notions about rape.

 

And, apparently, this is actually in accord with Oklahoma law, which still uses a standard requiring resistance.

Michelle Anderson is a feminist legal theorist, who takes this to be, legally though obviously NOT morally, the right ruling.

Michelle Anderson, the dean of the CUNY School of Law who has written extensively about rape law, called the ruling “appropriate” but the law “archaic”.

“This is a call for the legislature to change the statute, which is entirely out of step with what other states have done in this area and what Oklahoma should do,” she said. “It creates a huge loophole for sexual abuse that makes no sense.”

For more, go here.

 

Apparently Oklahoma is acting to change the law.

 

Brigham Young using Honor Code Against rape victims

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 6:31 am

At Brigham Young University, the flagship school of the Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints, the Honor Code rules campus life. The Honor Code, a broad and far-ranging document governed by LDS’s Church Education System, covers everything from drinking coffee to a “chaste and virtuous life,” “homosexual behavior,” alcohol consumption, clothing, and language. It’s the moral centerpiece of the private university, governing not just students, but faculty and staff as well…

But this year, four students with recent stories of rape or sexual assault have alleged that BYU has used its Honor Code to target them, unfairly, after the fact. They say that Title IX reports are forwarded to the Honor Code Office, putting alleged victims in line for discipline simply for reporting incidents of assault and abuse. Madeline MacDonald and Madison Barney, both undergraduates at BYU who were subject to Honor Code investigations after reporting their sexual assaults, told Jezebel that their attacks were picked apart by university administrators who they say hunted for potential violations gleaned from the details of police and Title IX reports.

For more, go here.

 

APA Blog on Diversifying Syllabi April 26, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 1:43 pm

Jesi Taylor, a current undergraduate, writes:

Even a slight change can make a huge difference. Sometimes just dipping your toes into the lake of diversity can make your transformative space, the classroom, a more inviting environment that can, to some students, feel emancipatory. Many conversations with fellow students have made it clear to me that students feel inspired to learn and compelled to engage with the text when they see or feel a bit of themselves in the syllabus. At Brooklyn College I was thrilled to read Fanon and Beauvoir in my Existentialism and Phenomenology course and Mary AstellElisabeth of Bohemia, and Anne Conway in my Modern Philosophy course.  We even read a piece by Eileen O’Neill entitled “Disappearing Ink: Early Modern Women Philosophers and Their Fate in History”. With those texts as the topic of discussion, we were able to discuss issues related to race and gender as they relate to ancient and contemporary issues in Philosophy.

For the whole post, go here.

 

 

CFR: Global Justice, Birmingham

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 11:35 am

The conference is interested in the ethics and politics of public policies that aim to enhance individual agency by shaping personal decision making and changing individual behaviours. Recent years have seen a proliferation of academic research and public programming aimed at improving individual and social outcomes through overt and covert efforts to change the decisions and behaviors of individual agents.  These policies raise deep ethical questions about the proper role of government, the circumstances of justice, the nature and importance of individual agency, and the role of social norms in shaping preferences and actions.

 Programme 26 May 2016

  • 9:00-10:00 Serena Parekh (Northeastern)-Taking Seriously the Agency of Refugees
  • 10:15-11:45 Grad Panel 1:
    • Jorge Fabra Zamora (McMaster)- Making Justice Real: The Challenges of Global Law
    • Blair Peruniak (Oxford)-Displacement, Responsibility, and Massively Shared Agency
    • Andrew Molas (York)- Defending the CRPD: Dignity, Flourishing, and the Universal Right to Mental Health
  • 11:45-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-14:15 Invited Keynote: Clare Chambers (Cambridge) – Regulating Religious Marriage
  • 14:15-15:15 Jennifer Morton (City College of NY)- Can Education Undermine Representation?
  • 15:30-16:30 Alison Jaggar (Colorado/Birmingham) and Corwin Aragon (Concordia) – Agency, Complicity, and Global Ethics: Social Power and the Responsibility to Remedy Structural Injustice
  • 16:45-18:15 Public Lecture: Carl Hart (Columbia) How Pot (and other recreational drugs) Can Cure Racism
  • 19:00-21:00 Conference Dinner

Programme 27 May 2016

  • 9:00-10:00 Invited Keynote: Serene Khader (Brooklyn College)- Do Muslim Women Really Need Freedom?
  • 10:30-12:00 Grad Panel 2:
    • Stephanie Sheintul (Wisconsin)- Moral Status and Paternalism;
    • Ji Young Lee (Bristol) A Millian Perspective on Paternalism;
    • Nicolas Brando (KU Leuven) Cultivating the Potential Self: Children and Agency in the Contractarian and Capability Theory
  • 12:00-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-14:15 Invited Keynote: Kimberley Brownlee—Global Issues of Sociability
  • 14:15-15:15 Steve Weidmer (Arkansas State)- Adaptive Preferences and Respect for Agency
  • 15:30-16:30 Heather Widdows (Birmingham)-The Demands of Beauty: Choice, Coercion, and Exploitation

For more, go here.

 

Philosophy suggestions for teenage girl? April 24, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 6:43 pm

A reader writes:

I have a 13 year old niece who is showing an (unprovoked, honest!) interest in

philosophy. She refuses to read Sophie’s World and I want to send her something

for her birthday that will provide a good route into philosophical thinking for a

teenage girl. Could you advise?

Your thoughts?

 

Faculty Hiring and “profound social inequality” April 23, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 6:30 pm

Below is an abstract from a paper by Aaron Clauset.  He uses network theory to bring out inequalities in gender that are less visible with some other methods.

(The paper: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/1/e1400005.full)

The three disciplines in his study are business, computer science, and history.

The faculty job market plays a fundamental role in shaping research priorities, educational outcomes, and career trajectories among scientists and institutions. However, a quantitative understanding of faculty hiring as a system is lacking. Using a simple technique to extract the institutional prestige ranking that best explains an observed faculty hiring network—who hires whose graduates as faculty—we present and analyze comprehensive placement data on nearly 19,000 regular faculty in three disparate disciplines. Across disciplines, we find that faculty hiring follows a common and steeply hierarchical structure that reflects profound social inequality. Furthermore, doctoral prestige alone better predicts ultimate placement than a U.S. News & World Report rank, women generally place worse than men, and increased institutional prestige leads to increased faculty production, better faculty placement, and a more influential position within the discipline. These results advance our ability to quantify the influence of prestige in academia and shed new light on the academic system.  (My stress.)

The finding, though in some ways obvious, that increased institutional prestige leads to increased productivity is quite depressing when linked to the idea that women in general get less prestigious positions.

 

 

Mother-friendly conference organising: an experiment April 21, 2016

To see how far we could get with small fixes — improving the aspects of academic conferences that are pretty easy to change — I organized an experimental conference along with June Gruber, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Colorado Boulder (and a fellow academic mom). The conference, held at the University of California Berkeley earlier this month, brought together an outstanding group of speakers using the latest psychological work to challenge misconceptions about the mind — from the idea that pursuing happiness is a good way to achieve it, to the idea that babies are born racist. We called the conference the Misconceptions of the Mind Conference: MoMiCon 2016. And we didn’t just invite the mommies: We invited the babies.

For more, go here.

 

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,684 other followers