APSA Hackathon

Of possible interest to readers (either to participate in this event or as a model for their own professional associations), the APSA is holding a “hackathon” next month to help men support women’s equality in political science. The hackathon is being organized by Jessica Preece and Macartan Humphreys and being held as part of the APSA’s 2018 annual meeting, Democracy and its Discontents.

Here is a partial description of the hackathon from the conference website:

Hackathons are events where communities of scholars, activists, programmers, and others come together to exchange ideas about and work collaboratively to provide solutions to a common problem. Hackathons may produce multiple outcomes, including the analysis and visualization of new data, websites, apps, research designs, consensus documents, policy proposals, and plans for social interventions. […] Our main goal to build on past and present efforts by APSA and its component organizations to promote diversity and inclusion by creating a collaborative, diverse, and inclusive space for annual meeting participants to come together. At the hackathon, teams will develop strategies that address key challenges facing the profession, build partnerships, and plans to move forward.

In preparation for the hackathon, organizers conducted an open-ended survey of women in the profession, which resulted in this list of suggestions.

Read more about the hackathon here.

(Thanks to JW for the heads up.)

 

UK prosecutions for “false rape accusations”

Quite unlike other jurisdictions, the UK has a habit of prosecuting women for “false rape accusations” (and then wondering why women won’t report the crime). Buzzfeed has an important expose out that finds (among other things):

At least 200 women in the UK have been prosecuted for lying about being raped in the past decade, according to a BuzzFeed News analysis of press reports. Most of these women were sent to prison, dozens of them with sentences of two or more years.

Prosecutors went after teenagers, and women who reportedly had mental health issues, had experienced past physical and sexual assault, or were grappling with drug and alcohol addiction.

Women were prosecuted even when they reportedly went to police only under pressure, quickly recanted, or never named their attacker at all.

The CPS has prosecuted women who police were not sure had lied. In one instance detectives declined to charge the woman for making a false complaint. Prosecutors went ahead anyway.

Read more here.

On Aid Programmes Aimed at Women

Feminist philosopher Serene Khader brings some much-needed complexity to the discussions.

According to Dr Khader, men have traditionally been enabled to work because their wives take care of children, the house and the garden.

“Many of the women would ostensibly be empowered through work are women who already get up at 4:00am to fetch 20 kilos of water from a well that is miles away; who spend hours cooking, shopping for food, and tending to fields, children in tow, and can only go to sleep after an evening meal is cleaned up after at 10:00 or 11:00pm,” Dr Khader said….

But Dr Khader warns that, in some cases, the extra workload benefits children at the expense of their mothers’ wellbeing.

She calls for a new approach to tackling social issues in the Global South — one that involves men…”Women’s empowerment irreducibly means that men will have to change.”

Read the whole thing.

Latest Free Speech Controversy

“Personally, I find the tiger’s views abhorrent,” read a New York Times op-ed column published just after the tiger got onto a school bus filled with third-graders. “But it’s far worse that left-wing groups are protesting by carrying fire and boarding up all their tiger-sized windows.”

“Let’s not forget; there’s plenty of people who find Bernie Sanders’ views offensive, too. It goes both ways.”

Here.

Online Misogyny in Philosophy

Cassie Herbert has written a piece for the APA Blog about online misogyny in professional philosophy.:

https://blog.apaonline.org/2018/07/04/women-in-philosophy-online-misogyny-and-our-profession/

She makes interesting points about misogyny and its connection to the pragmatics of various online interactions, including the uses of anonymity.

These sorts of interactions variously position women and gender minorities as incompetent epistemic agents, drain their epistemic resources, position them to speak for all other members of the group, and demand their attention in order to ‘prove’ their commitments and credentials. Intentionally or not, the pragmatic upshot is to manipulate the epistemic agency and subject positioning of their targets.

The anonymous philosophy blogs bring together these various levels of misogyny. They utilize both the threat of a media storm and the pragmatic structure of the comments to maintain a system of power within the profession. Sometimes the comments are explicitly misogynist: they denigrate women, non-binary folks, and trans folks. They debase their targets and call for “naming and shaming” philosophers from underrepresented groups who they don’t think have “earned” their successes. In choosing to out me as a survivor, while at the same time calling me a liar and characterizing themselves as my saviors, they multiply positioned me as powerless. All of these strategies draw on a system of power that works to maintain the status of privileged men. They position their targets as incompetent epistemic agents, and by extension incompetent philosophers.

 

 

 

Real-life Would-You-Rathers

From the ever-awesome McSweeney’s. A sample:

Would you rather realize you’ve spent way too much time writing a list of Catch-22s women face in 21st-century America, but you could still keep going because sexism is all around you all the time always any time you step outside, or realize you honestly don’t even know where your own internalized sexism ends because this patriarchal society is the only one you’ve ever known and what if someday everyone of every gender and color was equal but also is that even possible given the entrenched forces of capitalism and the inherent selfishness of human nature and let’s be real right now it’s hard to imagine what that utopian egalitarian feminist society would even look like and you’re just so so tired, you frumpy, melodramatic, PMS-ing, bossy, ball-busting bitch?

For the whole thing, go here.

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly has moved

Readers and writers will find that if one uses, as the URL for our journal, feministphilosophyquarterly.com, it now redirects to a new site on an Open Journal Systems platform. We welcome new submissions there! We also have all of our previous issues at the new site (click on Archives at the top of it or View All Issues at the bottom). If you go to the old BePress site, you will find only a link to the new page, so you’re encouraged to update your bookmarks now.

Scroll down on the home page to see the current issue includes:

Marie Draz, Burning it in? Nietzsche, Gender, and Externalized Memory

Samantha N. Wesch, Resisting Ilsa: Foucaultian Ethics and the Sexualization of Nazism

Symposium: Author Meets Critics, Disorientation and Moral Life by Ami Harbin

Critics: Cressida J. Heyes, Dislocation and Self-Certainty

Ted Rutland, Disoriented Life

Liat Ben-Moshe, Dis-orientation, Dis-epistemology and Abolition

Response: Ami Harbin

CFA for SAF at Central APA, Denver

Society for Analytical Feminism

Feminist Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS by July 6, 2018

SAF Session at the Central Division APA 2019

Denver, CO, February 20-23, 2019

PLEASE POST AND SHARE

 

The Society for Analytical Feminism invites submissions of abstracts of papers or proposals for a session at the 2019 Central Division APA meeting in Denver.

Deadline: July 6, 2018

The Society seeks abstracts of works that examine feminist issues by methods broadly construed as analytic, or that discuss the use of analytic philosophical methods as applied to feminist issues. Authors should submit abstracts for papers of a length appropriate to a 20-minute presentation time. (If you are proposing an author-meets-critics session, involving multiple people, we welcome that information but expect an abstract-length proposal indicating that the author has confirmed to you their intention to participate, as well as indication of the relevance of the book/author to a SAF session, such as the themes to be discussed.)

Please delete all self-identifying references from your abstract to ensure anonymity. Send submissions as a Word or PDF attachment with the subject line SAF AT APA to Kathryn Norlock (kathrynnorlock at gmail dot com). Deadline for submissions: Friday, July 6, 2018. Graduate students or underfunded professionals whose papers are accepted will be eligible for the Society’s $350 Travel Stipend. Please indicate in your email if you fall into one of these categories and wish to be considered for the stipend.

 

Most Dangerous Places for Women

A Thomson Reuters Foundation poll ranked the 10 most dangerous countries for women, based on the responses of experts. They considered gendered issues such as violence, healthcare, and economic access.

Here is a link to the reporting: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-women-dangerous-poll-factbox/factbox-which-are-the-worlds-10-most-dangerous-countries-for-women-idUSKBN1JM01Z

And here is a ranked list of the countries:

  1. India
  2. Afghanistan
  3. Syria
  4. Somalia
  5. Saudi Arabia
  6. Pakistan
  7. Democratic Republic of Congo
  8. Yemen
  9. Nigeria
  10. United States