Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

CFR: Global Justice, Birmingham April 26, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 11:35 am

The conference is interested in the ethics and politics of public policies that aim to enhance individual agency by shaping personal decision making and changing individual behaviours. Recent years have seen a proliferation of academic research and public programming aimed at improving individual and social outcomes through overt and covert efforts to change the decisions and behaviors of individual agents.  These policies raise deep ethical questions about the proper role of government, the circumstances of justice, the nature and importance of individual agency, and the role of social norms in shaping preferences and actions.

 Programme 26 May 2016

  • 9:00-10:00 Serena Parekh (Northeastern)-Taking Seriously the Agency of Refugees
  • 10:15-11:45 Grad Panel 1:
    • Jorge Fabra Zamora (McMaster)- Making Justice Real: The Challenges of Global Law
    • Blair Peruniak (Oxford)-Displacement, Responsibility, and Massively Shared Agency
    • Andrew Molas (York)- Defending the CRPD: Dignity, Flourishing, and the Universal Right to Mental Health
  • 11:45-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-14:15 Invited Keynote: Clare Chambers (Cambridge) – Regulating Religious Marriage
  • 14:15-15:15 Jennifer Morton (City College of NY)- Can Education Undermine Representation?
  • 15:30-16:30 Alison Jaggar (Colorado/Birmingham) and Corwin Aragon (Concordia) – Agency, Complicity, and Global Ethics: Social Power and the Responsibility to Remedy Structural Injustice
  • 16:45-18:15 Public Lecture: Carl Hart (Columbia) How Pot (and other recreational drugs) Can Cure Racism
  • 19:00-21:00 Conference Dinner

Programme 27 May 2016

  • 9:00-10:00 Invited Keynote: Serene Khader (Brooklyn College)- Do Muslim Women Really Need Freedom?
  • 10:30-12:00 Grad Panel 2:
    • Stephanie Sheintul (Wisconsin)- Moral Status and Paternalism;
    • Ji Young Lee (Bristol) A Millian Perspective on Paternalism;
    • Nicolas Brando (KU Leuven) Cultivating the Potential Self: Children and Agency in the Contractarian and Capability Theory
  • 12:00-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-14:15 Invited Keynote: Kimberley Brownlee—Global Issues of Sociability
  • 14:15-15:15 Steve Weidmer (Arkansas State)- Adaptive Preferences and Respect for Agency
  • 15:30-16:30 Heather Widdows (Birmingham)-The Demands of Beauty: Choice, Coercion, and Exploitation

For more, go here.

 

Philosophy suggestions for teenage girl? April 24, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 6:43 pm

A reader writes:

I have a 13 year old niece who is showing an (unprovoked, honest!) interest in

philosophy. She refuses to read Sophie’s World and I want to send her something

for her birthday that will provide a good route into philosophical thinking for a

teenage girl. Could you advise?

Your thoughts?

 

Faculty Hiring and “profound social inequality” April 23, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 6:30 pm

Below is an abstract from a paper by Aaron Clauset.  He uses network theory to bring out inequalities in gender that are less visible with some other methods.

(The paper: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/1/e1400005.full)

The three disciplines in his study are business, computer science, and history.

The faculty job market plays a fundamental role in shaping research priorities, educational outcomes, and career trajectories among scientists and institutions. However, a quantitative understanding of faculty hiring as a system is lacking. Using a simple technique to extract the institutional prestige ranking that best explains an observed faculty hiring network—who hires whose graduates as faculty—we present and analyze comprehensive placement data on nearly 19,000 regular faculty in three disparate disciplines. Across disciplines, we find that faculty hiring follows a common and steeply hierarchical structure that reflects profound social inequality. Furthermore, doctoral prestige alone better predicts ultimate placement than a U.S. News & World Report rank, women generally place worse than men, and increased institutional prestige leads to increased faculty production, better faculty placement, and a more influential position within the discipline. These results advance our ability to quantify the influence of prestige in academia and shed new light on the academic system.  (My stress.)

The finding, though in some ways obvious, that increased institutional prestige leads to increased productivity is quite depressing when linked to the idea that women in general get less prestigious positions.

 

 

Mother-friendly conference organising: an experiment April 21, 2016

To see how far we could get with small fixes — improving the aspects of academic conferences that are pretty easy to change — I organized an experimental conference along with June Gruber, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Colorado Boulder (and a fellow academic mom). The conference, held at the University of California Berkeley earlier this month, brought together an outstanding group of speakers using the latest psychological work to challenge misconceptions about the mind — from the idea that pursuing happiness is a good way to achieve it, to the idea that babies are born racist. We called the conference the Misconceptions of the Mind Conference: MoMiCon 2016. And we didn’t just invite the mommies: We invited the babies.

For more, go here.

 

CFR: Philosophy of Iris Murdoch, Oxford

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 2:37 pm

This one day event will consider a number of different themes from the philosophical writings of Iris Murdoch.

This page will be updated with the schedule closer to the time, but the list of talks is as follows:

Justin Broackes: “Reading On ‘God’ & ‘Good’.”‘

Edward Harcourt: “The Last and Secret Name of All the Virtues?”

Mark Hopwood: “Murdoch, Moral Language, and the Universality of Moral Reasons.”

Sabina Lovibond: “Iris Murdoch and the Quality of Consciousness.”

 

For more information, go here.

 

Dialogues on Disability – Bryce Huebner

Filed under: Uncategorized — Monkey @ 11:24 am

Time to celebrate: yesterday was the first year anniversary of Shelley’s excellent series of interviews with disabled philosophers! For this month’s special instalment, she invited her first guest, Bryce Huebner, to reflect on the insights provided by the series so far, and the issues surrounding disability and philosophy more generally. As always, it’s an important and thought-provoking read.

During the past year, I conducted landmark interviews for Dialogues on Disability with twelve disabled philosophers who are variously situated with respect to disability, race, gender, institutional status, age, culture, nationality, and sexuality, and whose philosophical work covers a wide range of areas of specialization and research interests. This first-anniversary installment of the series is designed to highlight insights and lessons that each of the twelve philosophers offered the philosophical community and to reflect upon the implications of these contributions to philosophy. Bryce Huebner, who was my first interviewee of the series and who has generously provided technical support over the course of the year, has returned today to assist me in this celebratory retrospective installment of the series.

You can read the full interview and join in the discussion here.

 

Sexist attacks on Clinton April 20, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 7:06 pm

Feminist philosopher Kate Manne:

“Ditch the witch,” and “Burn the witch,” Gillard’s opponents cried in her time, and their wish was soon granted. Now some of Sanders’ supporters are chanting, “Bern the witch,” in turn – unwittingly echoing misogynistic cries once heard across the Pacific ocean. There are many valid criticisms of Clinton, and legitimate reasons to vote for Sanders instead, whose political goals happen to be more in line with my own. But justifying such means in terms of these ends doesn’t survive moral scrutiny.

 

Read the rest!

 

Like mother, like daughter

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 5:45 pm

Apologies in advance to all the admirers of the targeted politicians, should any see this.

Mother
.

Daughter
.

 

 

h/t dailykos

 

Saba Fatima on Women in Islam April 19, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 11:51 am

Feminist philosopher Saba Fatima:

 I have been thinking about writing this blog for over a year. My reservation stemmed from the fact that for as long as I can remember, there has been a plethora of negative misconceptions about gender & Islam in the Western world, and I would hate to add any fuel to the fire.

Just recently, at the Republican debate in Miami on March 15, Donald Trump, the Republican frontrunner, stated: “There is tremendous hate. Where large portions of a group of people, Islam, large portions want to use very, very harsh means…Let me go a step further. Women are treated horribly. You know that. You do know that. Women are treated horribly, and other things are happening that are very, very bad.”

Such rhetoric (and its tamer forms) has been historically used to justify imperialistic wars against Muslim men, women, and children and has made the American public complacent to war crimes committed by Western governments. For some Americans, part of bombing the Middle East until ‘the sand glows in the dark’ is for their own benefit. To kill indiscriminately, in order to save their women from their men…. Or so the thinking goes.

Thanks, A!

 

Melissa Harris-Perry interviews Anita Hill

Filed under: gender,intersectionality,race,sexual harassment,Uncategorized — jennysaul @ 8:58 am

I really don’t need to say more than that, do I?  But if you want a teaser…

HARRIS-PERRY: How did race and gender affect how you were heard -during your testimony?
HILL: Those members of Congress had never even considered that Black women had our own political voice. They assumed that Black men spoke for us. For an African-American woman to have her own political voice and own political position, and to believe that our perspective should be added to the conversation, was just something they hadn’t even considered. I think that’s why, politically, things changed. I think that’s why women -became so agitated and so energized to make change on this important issue. And for Black women, it was like, Okay, we have to make sure we are speaking for ourselves.

 

For the rest, go here.

 

 
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