Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Marks and Sparks: diversity advocate? April 15, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 4:37 pm

I hope I get some help from people closer to the scene if there are nuances I’m not picking up on.

Here’s the thing, inspired by an article in the Guardian, I was trying to figure out the relative prevalence of the NEW crop tops in the UK and the States.  The NEW ones do not display one’s belly button.  Rather, they reveal one’s belt.

From the Guardian:

Struck by the idea that I was going to show up in England with completely passe long tops, I started to look for the NEW crop tops in the States. However, I couldn’t find any on the US sites I tried, so I decided to try UK sites.  I learned that as a fashion trend the NEW ones are very new, since they don’t have much of a presence.

so I turned to a site mentioned, Marks and Spencer’s, where I discovered their new ‘leading ladies’ campaign.  The outstanding women are photographed by Fran Liebowitz Annie Leibovitz, by the way.  

Though I never got a very good take on the prevalence of the NEW crop tops, I did discover an interesting campaign at Marks and Sparks.

image

 

Disability and Graduate School Considerations April 14, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized,disability,minorities in philosophy,deaf,graduate students — Teresa Blankmeyer Burke @ 11:33 am

Helen de Cruz has a great post up at NewAPPS that discusses, among other things, why graduate students might opt to attend unranked programs.

 

Another, often overlooked, consideration in play for some graduate students is disability. Some campuses are more friendly and accommodating to students with particular kinds of disabilities, some local communities have more resources than others, some states have policies that make it easier to be funded by vocational rehabilitation than others, some states (in the U.S.) provide tuition waivers to students with certain disabilities, and so on.

 

(more…)

 

Guggenheim Fellows: Two Feminist Philosophers April 12, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — KateNorlock @ 7:54 pm

If you look at the 2014 list of Guggenheim Fellowship recipients, you’ll see only two names under Philosophy: Eva Kittay and Laurie Paul.  Congratulations to our colleagues for this well-deserved honor!  It is an especial pleasure to see two feminists constitute the entire Philosophy list.

Congratulations are due to other philosophers and feminists, as well. Recipients in Classics include a notable philosopher, John Palmer, and recipients in Religion include a notable feminist, Joyce Flueckiger, author of When the World Becomes Female: Possibilities of a South Indian Goddess.  All recipients are to be commended.

 

Lori Gruen on recent animal deaths at European zoos April 10, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sam B @ 5:06 pm

“Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely. Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.”

Read the rest of Disposable Captives at the Oxford University Press blog.

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

Causing death is what zoos do. It is not all that they do, but it is a big part of what happens at zoos, even if this is usually hidden from the public. Zoos are institutions that not only purposely kill animals, they are also places that in holding certain animals captive, shorten their lives. Some animals, such as elephants and orca whales, cannot thrive in captivity and holding them in zoos and aquaria causes them to die prematurely.

Death is a natural part of life, and perhaps we would do well to have a less fearful, more accepting attitude about death. But those who purposefully bring about premature death run the risk of perpetuating the notion that some lives are disposable. It is that very idea that we can use and dispose of other animals as we please that has led to the problems that have zoos and others thinking about conservation in the first place. When institutions of captivity promote the idea that some animals are disposable by killing “genetically useless specimens” like young Marius and the lions, they may very well be undermining the tenuous conservation claims that are meant to justify their existence.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/04/disposable-captives-zoo-animals-philosophy/#sthash.MEsllNty.dpuf

 

The New Yorker profiles philosopher and letter writer Felicia Nimue Ackerman

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sam B @ 4:08 pm

“Felicia Nimue Ackerman—“Felicia Nimue is a double first name like Mary Jane, and I’m called the whole thing”—is a short-story writer and a philosophy professor at Brown, and she excels at crafting arguments concisely. Since 1987, the Times has printed more than two hundred of her letters, which is either a record or close to one. Tom Feyer, the letters editor, doesn’t keep count, but he named Ackerman as a top contender for first place. “Some days she sends several letters, each in response to a different article,” he said. “Although I don’t know her personally, I have a good sense of how she thinks.” In 2006, IvyGate, a gossip blog covering the Ivy League, published a post under the headline “New N.Y. Times Policy Requires All Letters to Be From Single Brown Professor.” The following year, Gawker wrote a post about one of Ackerman’s letters (“Ivy Professor: Sundaes Are Yummy!,” and a commenter wrote, “I used to edit the letters column for one of the pull-out sections in the Times, and we had a rule against running too many Felicia Ackermans…. One woman wrote us one time asking if her chances of having her letter published would be significantly improved if she signed her letter Felicia Ackerman.””

 

Read the rest here.

 

CFP: Phenomenology Roundtable

Filed under: Uncategorized — KateNorlock @ 3:56 pm

CFP: Phenomenology Roundtable
June 12-14 at Canisius College, Buffalo NY

Featuring Invited Presenter:
Dr. Jackie Martinez (Arizona State)

The Phenomenology Roundtable is a cooperative, supportive and critical environment for scholars whose work is inspired by the classical phenomenology of Edmund Husserl. We welcome works-in-progress at any stage of development. We welcome and encourage work in phenomenology that engages feminist theory, queer theory, ethical and political philosophy and philosophy of race and racism.

Email organizers about your intent to present by April 15th
Notification of Acceptance: April 30th
Works-in-Progress Due to conference participants: May 30th

For more information, email coordinators:

Melissa Mosko (moskom at canisius.edu)

David Leichter (djleichter24 at marianuniversity.edu)

 

Race Equality Survey of Black British Academics April 4, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jender @ 2:19 pm

Makes for grim reading. (Thanks, N!)

 

A Bechdel Test for Philosophy Papers

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jender @ 12:49 pm

Proposed here.

 

Celebrating anne fausto-sterling’s work April 1, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — annejjacobson @ 1:48 pm

image

 

Statement on APA accessibility March 31, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — magicalersatz @ 5:12 pm

A group of philosophers with disabilities (all members of the APA’s committee for inclusiveness in the profession) have written a statement regarding APA accessibility.

I encourage everyone to read the whole statement, but I particularly want to highlight this section:

The APA’s practice with regard to members with disabilities respects each individual seeking accommodation as the most knowledgeable source to identify effective solutions for that person’s circumstance. We appreciate the APA’s personalized interactive process for providing reasonable accommodation, which has served not only us but many other philosophers with disabilities well. For those readers unfamiliar with reasonable accommodation procedure, the APA’s individualized interactive process is the gold standard approach the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) endorsed after nationwide consultation with large numbers of people with various disabilities and with organizations that represent them.

We therefore are disconcerted to observe people signing on to a petition that makes claims about APA procedures that are untrue and assertions about people with disabilities suffering discrimination by the APA that do not accord with our experience. They may not be aware that harm can be occasioned by them doing so.

As a philosopher with a disability, this statement definitely resonates with my own experience of the APA, which has always very positive. Big thanks to the authors of this statement (Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Anita Silvers, and Adam Cureton) and to the APA for their continued efforts towards inclusiveness!

 

 
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