Feminist Philosophers

News feminist philosophers can use

Men on Death and the afterlife November 25, 2015

Filed under: gender,gendered conference campaign,sex — annejjacobson @ 3:22 pm

For an explanation of our Gendered Conference Campaign, see here.


Death and the Afterlife
22 January 2016

This symposium is an interdisciplinary exchange focused on the recent book Death and the Afterlife, by Professor Samuel Scheffler (New York University). It will bring together perspectives from social anthropology, philosophy, and political theory…It is open to scholars from all fields, and papers will be presented with a broad audience in mind.

Confirmed speakers:

Professor Samuel Scheffler (Department of Philosophy, New York University)
Professor Hallvard Lillehammer (Department of Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London)
Professor Joel Robins (Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge)
Dr James Laidlaw (Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge
Dr Jonathan Mair (School of Arts, Languages, and Cultures, University of Manchester)
Dr Paul Sagar (Deparment of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge)


GCC: Applied Ethics Edition November 11, 2015

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — noetika @ 3:21 am

Engineering and Applied Ethics Workshop.(For more information about the GCC, see here.)


GCC: (There were so many puns to be made I couldn’t even pick one)

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — noetika @ 3:17 am

Workshop on the epistemology of disagreement. (For more information about the GCC, see here.)


Congratulations! Your All Male Panel is Statistically Unlikely October 26, 2015

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — Audrey @ 10:24 pm

The issue of conferences in which all the invited speakers are male is probably well known to blog readers, and is the target of campaigns such as the Gendered Conference Campaign and the hilarious Tumblr Congrats, You Have An All Male Panel. Recently, Greg Martin, a mathematician at UBC, gave an interview with the Atlantic with a nice mathematical argument showing that most all-male panels are in fact statistically quite unlikely. This nicely undercuts an all-too-common response among conference organizers that their all-male panel “just happened” or was simply the result of chance.

If conference speakers were being chosen by a system that treated gender fairly (which is to say, gender was never a factor at all), then in any conference with over 10 speakers, say, it would be extremely rare to have no female speakers at all—less than 5 percent chance, depending on one’s assumption about the percentage of women in mathematics as a whole.

Turning that statement around, we conclude that any such conference without any female speakers must have come into being in a system that does not treat gender fairly.

Martin’s interview also links to a Conference Diversity Calculator that lets you play around with calculating the likelihoods of various demographic distributions among conference speakers, given their representation among the pool of available speakers.


Are we in denial? (GCC Post) October 20, 2015

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — philodaria @ 8:03 pm

How to say “no” (or, even, “no, seriously — no”) is a really philosophically interesting question, so this workshop, “How to Say ‘Yes’ or ‘No’: Logical Approaches to Modes of Assertion and Denial,” looks great; but, also, all of it’s invited speakers are male hence, this GCC post.

(For more information about the GCC, see here.)


Global Environmental Ethics for Men August 24, 2015

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — axiothea @ 12:33 pm

An all male line up for a conference on Justice and Climate Transitions at the IEA, Paris.

(For more information about the GCC, see here.)


A business argument for diversity (& a cartoon) May 16, 2015

Filed under: achieving equality,discrimination,gendered conference campaign — annejjacobson @ 8:00 pm

Not a new argument, but a useful source:

“fooled by Experience”
Soyer, Emre
Hogarth, Robin M.
Harvard Business Review. May2015, Vol. 93 Issue 5, p72-77. 6p.
As Peter Drucker wrote, “The first rule in decision making is that one does not make a decision unless there is disagreement.” To devise healthy strategies, executives need to hear many perspectives, including feedback that is critical of their own actions. Executives should surround themselves with people from diverse backgrounds and promote independent thinking in their team. Many executives task certain coworkers, friends, or family members with speaking frankly on important matters.
Ed Catmull, the president of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, stresses the importance of building a brain trust, a group of advisers who will deflate egos and voice unpopular opinions. He argues in his September 2008 HBR article that disagreements in meetings end up benefiting everyone in the long run, because “it’s far better to learn about problems from colleagues when there’s still time to fix them than from the audience after it’s too late.”

Also from the same issue of the Harvard Business Review:

A company’s reputation is reliant on the conduct of its employees. Posting “funny” videos of yourself online? What were you thinking?


GCC: Ontological Edition April 25, 2015

Filed under: gendered conference campaign — noetika @ 11:00 pm

Six (male) prominent figures in ontology have been gathered to speak at the International Summer School in Ontology, so participants can “consider […] the most interesting philosophical perspectives of our time.”

(For more information about the GCC, see here.)


Reflections on trying to organise a panel with more women March 10, 2015

Recently, we—Elisa Freschi and Malcolm Keating—set about organizing a panel for the upcoming ATINER panel. We aimed for a panel which would include significant numbers of women, using suggestions from the Gendered Conference Campaign (GCC) published on the Feminist Philosophers website to achieve this goal. Not only is the result an exciting combination of global philosophical interests which can push back against stereotypes of philosophy as a Western activity, its gender ratio can push back against stereotypes of philosophy as a male activity. Our hope is that the more panels and conferences which work to include women, the more women’s names will come to mind as experts in these topics. Further, hopefully younger generations of women will find it easier to find a path in academic philosophy. And finally, including more women who might otherwise be ignored due to implicit bias means better philosophy will be done.

Click here to read their reflections.


2014 and our profession January 3, 2015

There is, obviously, a lot that still needs to be done to make our profession the place we’d like it to be. And I find it’s far too easy to let negative stuff dominate my consciousness.  So over the last few days I’ve been asking people to send me lists of good things that have happened in our profession in the last year. Here’s a start. Please add more in comments!



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